Adventist Media Response and Conversation

Sunday, June 12, 2016

pj media hell

PJ media has a horrible article: https://pjmedia.com/…/dont-be-deceived-like-adam-and-eve-…/…

In that traditional but totally misguided article at one point it says:
" The Bible addresses all of those questions directly. For starters, God is loving and just (Ps. 33:4-5), and justice demands eternal punishment for all who reject God’s loving sacrifice of His own Son (Rom. 6:23)."
It is so pathetic how people use the Bible this way. Notice they give the Bible verse as if that ...verse says that eternal punishment is Justice. In Fact the verse simply says: Romans 6:23 (NIV)
23 For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in[a] Christ Jesus our Lord.
Death not eternal punishment in hell is what the text actually says. A billion and more years of torture for 100 hundred years of life, even rejecting God could never be considered justice. But of course they would condemn me of apostasy. Well yes I definitely am an apostate to traditional Christianity. Sadly traditional Christianity has not been too Christian and much more tradition.

Ali not so much a conscientious objector

I just saw this on the Spectrum website: "In this episode we're celebrating the life of Muhammad Ali among the Adventists in Berrien Springs, Michigan. Brenton Reading talks briefly about the upcoming Adventist Forum conference with Greg Boyd on the non-violent atonement. Alisa Williams shares some anecdotes on Muhammad Ali in and around Berrien Springs, Michigan. Finally, longtime Spectrum reader, Tom Kimmel, reflects on having Muhammad Ali as his neighbor and friend for thirty-five years."

I did not listen to the podcast about how it was to live in the same city with Ali. I only recently discovered that Ali was not a conscientious objector as I had always thought.  (I am also skeptical of the non-violent atonement topic, as Jesus was obviously violently treated by people and yet the atonement is brought into view by the treatment of God by man.)

In an article by Dr. Zuhdi Jasser I saw the following.

"There are many things to praise about Ali, but his 1971 comments in Clay vs. United States on the U.S. military and war are certainly not among them.

There is no denying that Muhammad Ali inspired, and continues to inspire, many. However, when I later learned about theocratic Islamism and its shar’iah state, I began to recognize that Ali, at times, said and believed things that were deeply troubling–things he may not have believed at his death, but that we certainly wouldn’t promote today because we would recognize how deeply radicalizing those ideas would be to young, impressionable Muslims.

Whatever one’s feelings about the merits of the Vietnam War, or even about the draft, Muhammad Ali’s statements about enlisting in the military were deeply problematic and actually had little to do with either. His position has been vastly oversimplified as a conscientious objection (CO) based on the fact that African-American citizens of the United States were already involved in a war for their own rights and the draft had accentuated that disparity. However, his real views at the time were something else entirely: he refused to join the military or defend the United States because the brand of Islam he espoused would not allow him to join anything other than a holy war, or a “war declared by Allah.

Perhaps Senator Paul, in his rush to appear progressive and to remain relevant, missed these statements in Ali’s 1971 testimony:


…and the teachings of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad tell us, and it is that we are not to participate in wars on the side of nobody who — on the side of nonbelievers, and this is a Christian country, and this is not a Muslim country…So, according to the Holy Qur’an, we are not to even aid in passing a cup of water to the even a wounded."
This testimony is, without a doubt, representative of the radical ideology Ali left later in life. But let’s be honest. These views on war and loyalty in particular are not unlike the views of those youth who leave the United States or Europe to join the Islamic State (IS), believing that they must fight in a great “cosmic war” against the “infidel.”

Thursday, June 18, 2015

The Rise and Fall of Intellectual Christianity



By Ron Corson

The word intellectual when not prefaced by the term “pointed headed,” reflects by definition the use of one’s intellect over emotion or experience. It is by and large in Western society the legacy of early Christianity. The Christian faith is built upon the books written by people after the time of Christ. Jesus wrote no words for us to quote or they would surely have become the Scripture to all Christians. There was no shortage of books about Jesus or about Christians in those first three centuries of the Common Era. There were many literary works with many differing views of God and Jesus Christ.

In the second century Marcion edited and presented his own view of what the Christian canon should be well before the proto orthodox (those who were the first to hold to what would become orthodox Christianity and the compiled a more standardized Christian belief) decided that a canon was a good idea. Marcion’s canon included several books by Paul and an edited version of something very similar to Luke’s Gospel minus the first few chapters. Marcion was a member of the Gnostic form of Christianity. As such the God of Jesus Christ and the God of the Old Testament were two different Gods and as with many Gnostic’s Jesus was not man or God/man He was a spirit, a phantom who only appeared to be a man. We know about Marcion because of what the Early Church Fathers wrote about him, we have none of his writings but we have a good number of other Gnostic writings many found in Nag Hammadi in 1945. Examples of Gnostic writing include the Gospel of Thomas, the Gospel of Philip and the Gospel of Truth. Those being the most readable but by no means cover all the Gnostic or other works from the early centuries of Christianity. Recently the news has told us about the new find called The Gospel of Judas. The debates in the first 400 years of the early church dealt with what today some call the “Lost Gospels”. It was from the Early Church Father’s writings until the find at Nag Hammadi that the Gnostic views were known. It was up to the Early Church Fathers to deal with those works and we can still read of their intellectual arguments.

The Early Church Fathers and even the Gnostic Christians were intellectuals. They used literary works to argue their position against the Gnostics and we have even seen Gnostic literary work that argues against the proto orthodox form of Christianity. The very literature we have today can often be traced back to these intellectual debates in early Christianity. Even the very simply logical idea of context of written material was decided by Christian argumentation. What is common sense to us today was part of the battle ground of the intellectual processes of our early Christian fathers. Today we would likely laugh at many of the arguments that some of the Early Church Fathers used. Yet the encapsulation of the Christian Canon was based upon years of Christian debate; arguments, rebuttals and appeals to reason. However these Christians show us intellectual debate does not remove God from the process.  God must act upon the human mind; it is the point of contact between the transcendent God and the physical man; the nexus between the spirit of man and the Spirit of God.

Intellectual Christianity takes work and as time passed it became easier to merely follow religious institutions. Man by his nature is often lazy and seeks the path of least resistance. Not all men of course, for the Christian church could never have been founded by lazy men and women. As orthodox Christianity grew and spread so did the power of the church. With time intellectual Christianity diminished. The Protestant Reformation gave renewed hope to Christianity as the intellectual Christians began to question what tradition had done to the orthodox Christian religion. The Bible as the accepted standard, again took center stage and intellectual Christians championed new ways of understanding the messages that God had inspired. The mind, perhaps God’s greatest handiwork was used by God through the agency of intellectual Christians to rehabilitate the Christian church from the damage done by tradition. When emotion and experience based upon tradition were opposed by the God enabled intellectuals, the church changed.

Protestants today are in need of intellectual Christianity as much as any other time in history. The intellectual activity of our predecessors does not automatically flow to us. Their wisdom and their folly are there to be seen and learned from by those willing to process the information. Protestant heritage includes great minds; men and women of great accomplishments. But to use our intellectual faculties we have to make decisions that likely will lead us away from traditions which were not well founded. Not all emotion, experience or tradition is contrary to intellectual process. But it is the intellectual process that evaluates emotion, experience and tradition deciding what to keep and what to discard. History is less a guide and more a milepost; a sign to the ever vigilant and a message to those who desire understanding.

As the Adventist church stands at a point where it must decide to cling to tradition or accept intellectual Christian challenges, so also must other Protestant churches. The term Evangelical at one time meant the idea of a church spreading the good news of God found in the four gospels. Today the term has come to mean the same as fundamentalist. Evangelical now means people who hold to the Bible as inerrant, infallible and holding to a strictly vicarious atonement, scientifically and socially out of step with reasonable people. While a Christian may not worry too much about what the world says of them (realizing that as Jesus said the world would reject His followers as it rejected Him). Still there may be some truth to those who now use the word Evangelical as derogatory.

The intellectual Christians that built up the church are becoming less and less visible. Today many of the large Protestant churches have abandoned the long held Protestant church practice of Sunday school. Many churches offer little opportunities for adults to interact with one another in the discussion of religious topics. Cell groups, the popular innovation of the last 20 years are sometimes so authoritarian that questioning a leader is not even allowed. Singing and Sermons have become the main form of religious instruction in today’s Protestant churches with the exception of Televangelists. Divergent views and questions have no place in today’s modern Christian churches. While Adventist churches have not abandoned the Sabbath school program it may be so poorly attended or conducted that it often becomes hard to find a Sabbath school that one feels comfortable presenting a differing view or posing serious questions. 

The reason for this situation is very likely that today’s Protestants, as well as Adventists, have accepted the idea that his or her church has “The Truth”. The truth is being preached and there is nothing anyone needs to question or challenge. To challenge and question is what the atheists and the worldly folk do, it is not what we Christians do. It is the decline and fall of the Christian intellectual as the traditional once again gains ascendancy. It is possibly a new Dark Ages at a critical time for Christianity, with the concurrent lack of viability of Christianity in Europe and Canada and the attacks of progressive secularism in America. For Christianity to survive outside of the uneducated third world intellectual Christianity must be maintained. It is something that the Adventist church must fight for; it is something our Sabbath schools must fight for. Sabbath or Sunday school are a good indication of how well members are assimilated in a church, equally importantly however they are vital to intellectual Christians. Stimulating the thinking process and spurring continued study and application of knowledge.

The Christian church has a long history of argument. The arguments are recorded in the New Testament book of Acts and the writings of Paul. Several New Testament authors warn of the false teachers of the day. Truth and error have always existed inside the Christian Church; even the very godly can produce error and error repeated can become tradition. Christian Intellectuals may not be in agreement, they may even argue in Sabbath school and be critical of their own churches, but it is all apart of the process of thinking and applying knowledge. Christian Intellectuals believe that God will lead them into all truth, as the Bible says. However, since throughout history we have not arrived at all truth it is not likely that we will arrive at all truth today or tomorrow. We are all works in progress, and it is our faith in God manifested in Jesus Christ that maintains our unity even during the disagreements.

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Earthtainer planting tub less expensive design

A while ago while searching for a planting container with built in plant support I came across the EarthTainer website. They give you very detailed instructions in video and pdf format and they are completely free. You will likely notice that the video instructions are different from the pdf, mainly because they use different tomato support systems. The one I used is the most widely available and worked well. What I did not like about their system was that it used 2 31 gal Rugged Tote containers. Which are a good container but the system requires that one of the 2 containers is sacrificed to build the aeration bench. Since the price at Lowes is about 16 dollars per container that seemed rather wasteful. However I found at Lowes a cheaper container which has a much sturdier lid. By cutting the lid and using it to create the aeration bench I was able to cut the price in half.  Still if you decide to build one or more of these follow the link on the EarthTainer PDF guide and order wire rope clips as they cost about 88 cents a piece at Lowes. But you can order 100 online which seems to work out to 22 cents per clip.

Here is the EarthTainer Illustration to give you an Idea of how the system works.


So I would encourage you to watch their  Introduction video and the video of how to attach cage system.  Then take a look at the pictures here and try and make my version of the EarthTainer using "Commander XXL" tub. Size wise it is 4 gallons less then the Rugged Tote so there is a little less area for soil because the Rugged Tote is about 3 inches higher but it should be enough room for your roots and since you add fertilizer to the water there is less need for extensive root structure.
















Saturday, May 16, 2015

Goldstein...you don't belong!

Today I saw and interview with Clifford Goldstein on 3ABN The show was 3ABN Today. I saw it on 5-16-2015 though I don't know if that was the original air date or not. In this portion which I have recorded and placed on YouTube Goldstein the following is stated:




Interviewed by Shelly Quinn on 3ABN Today; speaking of a new series Goldstein is introducing on the 3ABN channel:

“…Why would Adventists want to watch your program, who already believe in the Bible?”

Goldstein:
“Well we are all assaulted by this in the church being assaulted by this, we are also in the church being assaulted by evolution by a lot of you know even professed Adventists who believe in evolution and I am sorry if you believe that God used millions of years what they now call neo-darwinian synthesis to create life you do not belong in the Seventh-day Adventist church.”

Quinn:
“I agree”

Goldstein:
“You don’t  belong  here, some people say they can reconcile it well I think they are being deluded. But there are a lot, particularly our young people who tend to be a lot more honest  and if I were a young Seventh–day Adventist and I were convinced that evolution were true I don’t know how I could remain a Seventh-day Adventist…”
 
There are a number of problems here. First he miss defines Neo-Darwinian synthesis apparently conflating it with Theistic Evolution.  The definitions follow later. The really key problem here is that his view produces a self fulfilling prophecy. His view is that if Adventists believe that God used millions of years then you don't belong in the Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Church. Then in his estimation if you are a young person who believes in evolution (apparently any kind, I don't know, let us for this article assume he just means that evolution was a involved in millions of years to get to life that we see today) then you simply could not remain an SDA. Why would that be? The simple answer is because people like him say that you don't belong. He then thinks that these young people are more honest then those older deluded Adventists who came to realize the reality as they see it in the principles of evolution and the evidence for an earth that is much older then traditional Adventism says. These older people did not have people in General Conference leadership roles telling them they did not belong in the SDA church. Well he clearly is out to fix that! They simply don't belong!
 
The Adventist church has somewhat allowed the divergent beliefs of those who can synthesize modern science and theology but it has become an exceedingly unfriendly place for such people. After all why be part of a group that says you don't belong. Not something I would fight to remain in, but that may be because I find so many other problems in the SDA church.
 
If any of you think that this is simply about the wording of a fundamental belief to be decided at the upcoming General Conference session...you are in for a disappointment.
 
Now for some definitions.
        
Theistic evolution is the teaching that God used natural evolutionary processes to bring     life  to its current level of speciation. Theistic evolution would deny the specific creative act of God in bringing the person of Adam, who would be the first human and the representative of mankind, into existence.https://carm.org/dictionary-theistic-evolution

 
Theistic Evolution would include most of the variants of Intelligent Design and has been the view of notable Christians such as C.S. Lewis: "C.S. Lewis clearly believed that Christians can accept evolution as common descent without doing violence to their faith. This is what Lewis was getting at when he wrote to evolution critic Bernard Acworth, "I believe that Christianity can still be believed, even if evolution is true."18 In Lewis's view, whether God used common descent to create the first human beings was irrelevant to the truth of Christianity. As he wrote to one correspondent late in his life, "I don't mind whether God made man out of earth or whether 'earth' merely means 'previous millennia of ancestral organisms.' If the fossils make it probable that man's physical ancestors 'evolved,' no matter." http://www.evolutionnews.org/2013/11/darwin_in_the_d_1079231.html

 
What is intelligent design?
Intelligent design refers to a scientific research program as well as a community of scientists, philosophers and other scholars who seek evidence of design in nature. The theory of intelligent design holds that certain features of the universe and of living things are best explained by an intelligent cause, not an undirected process such as natural selection. Through the study and analysis of a system's components, a design theorist is able to determine whether various natural structures are the product of chance, natural law, intelligent design, or some combination thereof. Such research is conducted by observing the types of information produced when intelligent agents act. Scientists then seek to find objects which have those same types of informational properties which we commonly know come from intelligence. Intelligent design has applied these scientific methods to detect design in irreducibly complex biological structures, the complex and specified information content in DNA, the life-sustaining physical architecture of the universe, and the geologically rapid origin of biological diversity in the fossil record during the Cambrian explosion approximately 530 million years ago. http://www.intelligentdesign.org/whatisid.php1. T

The Neo-Darwinian Synthesis (also called the "Synthetic Theory of Evolution")

• formulated during the decade 1937-1947.
• updated Darwin's ideas using new information from many scientific fields.
• main features of this view are mutation and natural selection.
• genetic mutations produce variation within a population (Darwin could not explain variation).
• natural selection preserves the most fit varieties within a species, as explained by Darwin.
• macroevolution is simply microevolution extrapolated.
• evolution is slow, gradual, and continuous, as held by Darwin.
• this view has difficulty explaining the fossil record with its lack of transitional forms.
In the 1930s and '40s evolutionists worked to incorporate new data from various subdisciplines of biology into a revised version of classical Darwinism. The primary focus on natural selection was maintained, but other aspects of Darwin's thinking were updated.  http://www.creationbc.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=124&Itemid=62

 
You can see that there is a large division between Neo-Darwinian Synthesis and Theistic Evolution and Intelligent Design...that being the unseen hand of God somehow at work. Which makes Goldstein's use in the sentence completely wrong. "I am sorry if you believe that God used millions of years what they now call neo-Darwinian synthesis to create life you do not belong in the Seventh-day Adventist church.” If he meant to say that naturalistic atheistic evolution then I could agree because why be a part of a theistic church if you don't believe there is a God then I would not have a problem with his view. But since in the sentence he specifically said "if you believe that God used" and then reference an entirely naturalistic evolutionary process his statement does not work on any level. Sadly like the interviewer Shelly Quinn there are far to many people who will simply agree with Goldstein's incorrect logic and use of terms.
 
 

 

Saturday, May 09, 2015

Ellen White Quotes on Substitution







This is for people who think that Ellen White did not hold to the Substitutionary view of the Atonement. Many of the followers of A. Graham Maxwell think that Ellen would subscribe to what he terms the “Larger View” which is more similar to the Moral Influence Theory then to the Penal/ Substitutionary theory. A search of the MLI software CD Rom of all the published writings of Ellen White with the addition of a few private collections reveals that she used the term “Substitute and surety” about Jesus 156 times. The following 55 pages of Ellen White quotes includes all of those 156 references as well as her other references where she speaks of Jesus Christ as man’s substitute. If anyone is honest with themselves they will realize that the term substitute is the foundation upon which the Penal / Substitutionary theory of the atonement is based.  She is not Substitutionary in isolated instances but that is her predominate view. She does include some Moral Influence views also, as does almost all other theories of the Atonement since it is the clearest and most straight forward of Atonement views and has been a part of the Substitutionary view of the atonement since the days of Hugo Grotus.
 
Before the comprehensive listing of Ellen White’s  “Substitute” quotes I have created a section which lists her most exclaimatory comments reflecting her Substitutionary view of the atonement. To save space relevant sections are quoted in the first section, the following section contains the entire paragraph quotes.
 
DA.753.001
      Upon Christ as our substitute and surety was laid the iniquity of us all. He was counted a transgressor, that He might redeem us from the condemnation of the law. The guilt of every descendant of Adam was pressing upon His heart. The wrath of God against sin, the terrible manifestation of His displeasure because of iniquity, filled the soul of His Son with consternation.
 
AG.1903-08-19.003 Atlantic Union Gleaner 1903
Our Only Hope.      God's law has lost none of its force. In his sight sin is still a hateful thing. Because we have sinned, we must personally bear the condemnation of the law, unless some one else, one in whom no taint of sin can be found, will bear the condemnation in our behalf. Without a substitute, we have no hope of pardon and salvation.
 
BE.1894-11-05.005  Bible Echo 1894
      We are not under a system of mere requirements, mere justice, and unsympathizing rigour. The penalty of transgressing the law has fallen upon our Substitute and Surety, and for a time has been suspended, so that the guilty do not feel its weight; but the object of this suspension is not to teach us that its claims are over, its exactions set aside, but to attract us to holiness, to obedience.
 
PT.1886-02-04.001 Present Truth (British) 1886
      It was not the dread of death which caused the inexpressible agony of Jesus…. It was the guilt of sin, bringing the Father's wrath upon him as man's substitute, that broke the heart of the Son of God.
 
SS.1895-11-01.003  Sabbath-School Worker 1895
      The plan of redemption is perfect in all its parts. It does not demerit or lessen the claims of the law of God in one jot or one tittle in saving the sinner from the just penalty of the law. Through the provision of the death of God's only-begotten Son in sinners' behalf, the immutability of the law of God is demonstrated for time and eternity. Justice honors the law of God in providing a substitute for the transgressor; for Christ gave his own life a ransom in order that God might be just and yet be the justifier of him who believes in Jesus. The work of saving the lost through the merit of Christ magnifies the law and harmonizes with every perfection of Jehovah. In the plan of salvation the highest honor is paid to the law of heaven's government, and yet mercy is freely dispensed to the fallen sons of Adam.
 
RH.1873-01-21.003  Advent Review and Sabbath Herald 1873
      Christ came not confessing his own sins; but guilt was imputed to him as the sinner's substitute. He came not to repent on his own account; but in behalf of the sinner. As man had transgressed the law of God, Christ was to fulfill every requirement of that law, and thus show perfect obedience. "Lo, I come to do thy will, O God!" Christ honored the ordinance of baptism by submitting to this rite. In this act he identified himself with his people as their representative and head. As their substitute, he takes upon him their sins, numbering himself with the transgressors, taking the steps the sinner is required to take, and doing the work the sinner must do
 
RH.1874-03-03.001
      Fallen man, because of his guilt, could no longer come directly before God with his supplications, for his transgression of the divine law had placed an impassable barrier between the holy God and the transgressor. But a plan was devised that the sentence of death should rest upon a substitute of superior value to the law of God. In the plan of redemption there must be the shedding of blood, for death must come in consequence of man's sin. The beasts for sacrificial offerings were to prefigure Christ. In the slain victim, man was to see the fulfillment for the time being of God's word, "Ye shall surely die." And the flowing of the blood from the victim would also signify an atonement. There was no virtue in the blood of animals; but the shedding of the blood of beasts was to point forward to a Redeemer who would one day come to the world and die for the sins of men. And thus Christ would fully vindicate his Father's law.
 
RH.1887-07-05.008
      Christ was to die as man's substitute. Man was a criminal under the sentence of death for transgression of the law of God as a traitor, a rebel; hence a substitute for man must die as a malefactor, because he stood in the place of the traitors, with all their treasured sins upon his divine soul. It was not enough that Jesus should die in order to fully meet the demands of the broken law, but he died a shameful death. The prophet gives to the world his words, "I hid not my face from shame and spitting."
 
RH.1892-07-05.008
      The only definition the Bible gives of sin is that it is "the transgression of the law." While we are to repent toward God for the transgression of the law, we are not to look to the law for remission of sins, or for justification. Neither are we to imagine that repentance for past sin will be all-sufficient; for in order to be saved, we must have faith in our Lord Jesus Christ. When we accept Christ as our sacrifice, our substitute, our righteousness, then we behold the Father in a different light from that in which too many have regarded him in the past.
 
RH.1896-06-23.003
 But he suffered humiliation, agony, and death in silence, because he had given his life for the life of the world. He was not compelled to do it, but he volunteered to be man's substitute and surety, and "the Lord laid on him the iniquity of us all." The wages of sin is death, and he freely offered himself as a propitiation for the sins of men.
 
RH.1912-11-28.003
      The divine Author of salvation left nothing incomplete in the plan; every phase of it is perfect. The sin of the whole world was laid upon Jesus, and divinity gave its highest value to the suffering of humanity in Jesus, that the whole world might be pardoned through faith in the Substitute.
 
RH.1899-05-23.008
      Christ bore the penalty that would have fallen upon the transgressor; and through faith the helpless, hopeless sinnerbecomes a partaker of the divine nature, escaping the corruption that is in the world through lust. Christ imputes his perfection and righteousness to the believing sinner when he does not continue in sin, but turns from transgression to obedience of the commandments.
 
RH.1901-05-07.003       The fiat has gone forth, "The wages of sin is death." The sinner must feel his guiltiness, else he will never repent. He has broken the law, and in so doing has placed himself under its condemnation. The law has no power to pardon the transgressor, but it points him to Christ Jesus, who says to him, I will take your sin and bear it myself, if you will accept me as your substitute and surety. Return to your allegiance, and I will impute to you my righteousness. You will be made complete in me.
 
RH.1912-11-28.003
      The divine Author of salvation left nothing incomplete in the plan; every phase of it is perfect. The sin of the whole world was laid upon Jesus, and divinity gave its highest value to the suffering of humanity in Jesus, that the whole world might be pardoned through faith in the Substitute.
 
ST.1898-04-07.007 Signs of the Times
      Man broke the law of God, and defied His will. This law reveals to the world the attributes of God's character, and not a jot or tittle of it could be changed to meet man in his fallen condition. God could not abolish His law to save men; for this would have immortalized transgression. But He gave men unmistakable evidence that He loved them, and that justice is the foundation of His throne and the evidence of His love. He carried out the penalty of transgression, but He allowed it to fall upon a substitute, even His only-begotten Son
 
ST.1915-01-05.013    
  Through the guilty from moral defilement, and impart to them His own righteousness. He died to make an atonement, to redeem, cleanse, restore, and exalt man to a place at His right hand.death of Christ a door of hope was opened for fallen man. Man was under sentence of death for the transgression of the law of God. He was under condemnation as a traitor, as a rebel; but Christ came to be his substitute, to die as a malefactor, to suffer the penalty of the traitors, bearing the weight of their sins upon His divine soul. He descended lower and lower, till there were no lower depths of humiliation to sound, in order that He might lift up those who would believe in Him, and cleanse the
 
 
 
4T.528.001 Testimonies for the Church vol 4 1876-81      We must have a converted ministry. The efficiency and power attending a truly converted ministry would make the hypocrites in Zion tremble and sinners afraid. The standard of truth and holiness is trailing in the dust. If those who sound the solemn notes of warning for this time could realize their accountability to God they would see the necessity for fervent prayer. When the cities were hushed in midnight slumber, when every man had gone to his own house, Christ, our Example, would repair to the Mount of Olives, and there, amid the overshadowing trees, would spend the entire night in prayer. He who was Himself without the taint of sin,--a treasure house of blessing; whose voice was heard in the fourth watch of the night by the terrified disciples upon the stormy sea, in heavenly benediction; and whose word could summon the dead from their graves,--He it was who made supplication with strong crying and tears. He prayed not for Himself, but for those whom He came to save. As He became a suppliant, seeking at the hand of His Father fresh supplies of strength, and coming forth refreshed and invigorated as man's substitute, He identified Himself with suffering humanity and gave them an example of the necessity of prayer.
 
5T.025.002  1889
      In the word of God the mind finds subject for the deepest thought, the loftiest aspiration. Here we may hold communion with patriarchs and prophets, and listen to the voice of the Eternal as He speaks with men. Here we behold the Majesty of heaven as He humbled Himself to become our substitute and surety to cope singlehanded with the powers of darkness and to gain the victory in our behalf. A reverent contemplation of such themes as these cannot fail to soften, purify, and ennoble the heart, and, at the same time, to inspire the mind with new strength and vigor.
 
CED.038.001 Christian Education 1893
      In the word of God the mind finds subject for the deepest thought, the loftiest aspiration. Here we may hold communion with patriarchs and prophets, and listen to the voice of the Eternal as he speaks with men. Here, we behold the Majesty of heaven, as he humbled himself to become our substitute and surety, to cope single-handed with the powers of darkness, and to gain the victory in our behalf. A reverent contemplation of such themes as these, cannot fail to soften, purify, and ennoble the heart, and, at the same time, to inspire the mind with new strength and vigor.
 
CED.112.001
      There are but few who have an appreciation of the grievous character of sin, and who comprehend the greatness of the ruin that has resulted from the transgression of God's law. By examining the wonderful plan of redemption to restore the sinner to the moral image of God, we see that the only means for man's deliverance was wrought out by the self-sacrifice, and the unparalleled condescension and love of the Son of God. He alone had the strength to fight the battles with the great adversary of God and man, and, as our substitute and surety, he has given power to those who lay hold of him by faith, to become victors in his name, and through his merits.
 
CED.112.002
      We can see in the cross of Calvary what it has cost the Son of God to bring salvation to a fallen race. As the sacrifice in behalf of man was complete, so the restoration of man from the defilement of sin must be thorough and complete. The law of God has been given to us, that we may have rules to govern our conduct. There is no act of wickedness that the law will excuse; there is no unrighteousness that will escape its condemnation. The life of Christ is a perfect fulfillment of every precept of this law. He says, "I have kept my Father's commandments."[JOHN 15:10.] The knowledge of the law would condemn the sinner, and crush hope from his breast, if he did not see Jesus as his substitute and surety, ready to pardon his transgression, and to forgive his sin. When, through faith in Jesus Christ, man does according to the very best of his ability, and seeks to keep the way of the Lord by obedience to the ten commandments, the perfection of Christ is imputed to cover the transgression of the repentant and obedient soul.
 
CED.119.002
      Those who are teaching the most solemn message ever given to the world, should discipline the mind to comprehend its significance. The theme of redemption will bear the most concentrated study, and its depth will never be fully explored. You need not fear that you will exhaust this wonderful theme. Drink deep of the well of salvation. Go to the fountain for yourself, that you may be filled with refreshment, that Jesus may be in you a well of water, springing up unto everlasting life. Only Bible truth and Bible religion will stand the test of the judgment. We are not to pervert the word of God to suit our convenience, and worldly interests, but to honestly inquire, "What wilt thou have me to do?" "Ye are not your own, for ye are bought with a price."[1 COR. 6:19, 20.] And what a price! Not "with corruptible things, as silver and gold, . . . but with the precious blood of Christ."[1 PETER 1:18, 19.] When man was lost, the Son of God said, I will redeem him, I will become his surety and substitute. He laid aside his royal robes, clothed his divinity with humanity, stepped down from the royal throne, that he might reach the very depth of human woe and temptation, lift up our fallen natures, and make it possible for us to be overcomers,--the sons of God, the heirs of the eternal kingdom. Shall we then allow any consideration of earth to turn us away from the path of truth? Shall we not challenge every doctrine and theory, and put it to the test of God's word?
 
COL.157.001 Christ's Object Lessons, 1900
      Christ has pledged Himself to be our substitute and surety, and He neglects no one. He who could not see human beings exposed to eternal ruin without pouring out His soul unto death in their behalf, will look with pity and compassion upon every soul who realizes that he cannot save himself.
 
CT.052.003 Councils to Parents, Teachers and Students 1913
      In the word of God the mind finds subjects for the deepest thought, the loftiest aspirations. Here we may hold communion with patriarchs and prophets, and listen to the voice of the Eternal as He speaks with men. Here we behold the Majesty of heaven as He humbled Himself to become our substitute and surety, to cope singlehanded with the powers of darkness and to gain the victory in our behalf. A reverent contemplation of such themes as these cannot fail to soften, purify, and ennoble the heart, and at the same time to inspire the mind with new strength and vigor.
 
DA.050.001 Desire of Ages 1898
      About forty days after the birth of Christ, Joseph and Mary took Him to Jerusalem, to present Him to the Lord, and to offer sacrifice. This was according to the Jewish law, and as man's substitute Christ must conform to the law in every particular. He had already been subjected to the rite of circumcision, as a pledge of His obedience to the law.
 
DA.483.005
      "Therefore doth My Father love Me, because I lay down My life, that I might take it again." That is, My Father has so loved you, that He even loves Me more for giving My life to redeem you. In becoming your substitute and surety, by surrendering My life, by taking your liabilities, your transgressions, I am endeared to My Father.
 
DA.686.004
      Christ was now standing in a different attitude from that in which He had ever stood before. His suffering can best be described in the words of the prophet, "Awake, O sword, against My shepherd, and against the man that is My fellow, saith the Lord of hosts." Zech. 13:7. As the substitute and surety for sinful man, Christ was suffering under divine justice. He saw what justice meant. Hitherto He had been as an intercessor for others; now He longed to have an intercessor for Himself.
 
DA.741.002
      "That He might sanctify the people with His own blood," Christ "suffered without the gate." Heb. 13:12. For transgression of the law of God, Adam and Eve were banished from Eden. Christ, our substitute, was to suffer without the boundaries of Jerusalem. He died outside the gate, where felons and murderers were executed. Full of significance are the words, "Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us." Gal. 3:13.
 
DA.753.001
      Upon Christ as our substitute and surety was laid the iniquity of us all. He was counted a transgressor, that He might redeem us from the condemnation of the law. The guilt of every descendant of Adam was pressing upon His heart. The wrath of God against sin, the terrible manifestation of His displeasure because of iniquity, filled the soul of His Son with consternation. All His life Christ had been publishing to a fallen world the good news of the Father's mercy and pardoning love. Salvation for the chief of sinners was His theme. But now with the terrible weight of guilt He bears, He cannot see the Father's reconciling face. The withdrawal of the divine countenance from the Saviour in this hour of supreme anguish pierced His heart with a sorrow that can never be fully understood by man. So great was this agony that His physical pain was hardly felt.
 
DA.753.002
      Satan with his fierce temptations wrung the heart of Jesus. The Saviour could not see through the portals of the tomb. Hope did not present to Him His coming forth from the grave a conqueror, or tell Him of the Father's acceptance of the sacrifice. He feared that sin was so offensive to God that Their separation was to be eternal. Christ felt the anguish which the sinner will feel when mercy shall no longer plead for the guilty race. It was the sense of sin, bringing the Father's wrath upon Him as man's substitute, that made the cup He drank so bitter, and broke the heart of the Son of God.
 
GC.420.001 1911
      Important truths concerning the atonement are taught by the typical service. A substitute was accepted in the sinner's stead; but the sin was not canceled by the blood of the victim. A means was thus provided by which it was transferred to the sanctuary. By the offering of blood the sinner acknowledged the authority of the law, confessed his guilt in transgression, and expressed his desire for pardon through faith in a Redeemer to come; but he was not yet entirely released from the condemnation of the law. On the Day of Atonement the high priest, having taken an offering from the congregation, went into the most holy place with the blood of this offering, and sprinkled it upon the mercy seat, directly over the law, to make satisfaction for its claims. Then, in his character of mediator, he took the sins upon himself and bore them from the sanctuary. Placing his hands upon the head of the scapegoat, he confessed over him all these sins, thus in figure transferring them from himself to the goat. The goat then bore them away, and they were regarded as forever separated from the people.
 
Prophets and Kings .691.001  1917
      Of the suffering Saviour Jehovah Himself declared through Zechariah, "Awake, O sword, against My Shepherd, and against the Man that is My Fellow." Zechariah 13:7. As the substitute and surety for sinful man, Christ was to suffer under divine justice. He was to understand what justice meant. He was to know what it means for sinners to stand before God without an intercessor.
 
PP.366.001 Patriachs and Prophets 1890
      In all these revelations of the divine presence the glory of God was manifested through Christ. Not alone at the Saviour's advent, but through all the ages after the Fall and the promise of redemption, "God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto Himself." 2 Corinthians 5:19. Christ was the foundation and center of the sacrificial system in both the patriarchal and the Jewish age. Since the sin of our first parents there has been no direct communication between God and man. The Father has given the world into the hands of Christ, that through His mediatorial work He may redeem man and vindicate the authority and holiness of the law of God. All the communion between heaven and the fallen race has been through Christ. It was the Son of God that gave to our first parents the promise of redemption. It was He who revealed Himself to the patriarchs. Adam, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Moses understood the gospel. They looked for salvation through man's Substitute and Surety. These holy men of old held communion with the Saviour who was to come to our world in human flesh; and some of them talked with Christ and heavenly angels face to face.
 
SC.014.001 Steps to Christ 1892
      Jesus said, "Therefore doth My Father love Me, because I lay down My life, that I might take it again." John 10:17. That is, "My Father has so loved you that He even loves Me more for giving My life to redeem you. In becoming your Substitute and Surety, by surrendering My life, by taking your liabilities, your transgressions, I am endeared to My Father; for by My sacrifice, God can be just, and yet the Justifier of him who believeth in Jesus."
 
SPTED.018.001 Special Testimonies on Education 1897
      Where shall we find laws more noble, pure, and just, than are exhibited on the statute-books wherein is recorded the instruction given to Moses for the children of Israel? Through all time these laws are to be perpetuated, that the character of God's people may be formed after the divine similitude. The law is a wall of protection to those who are obedient to God's precepts. From what other source can we gather such strength, or learn such noble science? What other book will teach men to love, fear, and obey God as does the Bible? What other book presents to students more ennobling science, more wonderful history? It clearly portrays righteousness, and foretells the consequence of disloyalty to the law of Jehovah. No one is left in darkness as to that which God approves or disapproves. In studying the Scriptures we become acquainted with God, and are led to understand our relation to Christ, who is the sin-bearer, the surety, the substitute, for our fallen race. These truths concern our present and eternal interests. The Bible stands the highest among books, and its study is valuable above the study of other literature in giving strength and expansion to the mind. Paul says: "Study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth." "But continue thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou has learned them; and that from a child thou hast known the holy Scriptures, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness; that the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works." "For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope."
 
SPTED.220.001
      The Lord God came down to our world clothed with the habiliments of humanity, that he might work out in his own life the mysterious controversy between Christ and Satan. He discomfited the powers of darkness. All this history is saying to man, I, your substitute and surety, have taken your nature upon me, showing you that every son and daughter of Adam is privileged to become a partaker of the divine nature, and through Christ Jesus lay hold upon immortality. Those who are candidates for this great blessing should in everything act in a manner to represent the advantages of their association with the Lord through his revealed truth and through the sanctification of his Holy Spirit. This will enlarge the mind of the human agent, fasten it upon sacred things, set it to receive truth, to comprehend truth, which will lead to the working out of truth through the sanctification of heart, soul, and character.
223.001
The object of this great sacrifice should also be kept before them; for it was to uplift fallen man degraded by sin that this great sacrifice was made. Christ suffered in order that through faith in him our sins might be pardoned. He became man's substitute and surety, himself taking the punishment, though all undeserving, that we who deserved it might be free, and return to our allegiance to God through the merits of a crucified and risen Saviour. He is our only hope of salvation. Through his sacrifice we who are now on probation are prisoners of hope. We are to reveal to the universe, to the world fallen and to worlds unfallen, that there is forgiveness with God, that through the love of God we may be reconciled to God. Man repents, becomes contrite in heart, believes in Christ as his atoning sacrifice, and realizes that God is reconciled to him.
 
SWK.034.002  The Southern Work 1898
      But while Christ pronounced a woe upon those who did not repent at His preaching, He had a word of encouragement for the lowly: "At that time Jesus answered and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes. Even so, Father: for so it seemed good in thy sight." Many of the colored people are among the lowly who will receive the Word of God, and shall not this long-neglected work of enlightening the colored people be entered into perseveringly, and be carried forward all the more diligently because it has been so long neglected? We must do a work for the colored race that has not yet been done. "God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him might not perish, but have everlasting life." The Son of God, the Creator of the world, sacrificed His own life in order that He might become the Redeemer of fallen humanity. He made an infinite sacrifice that He might become man's surety and substitute, and shall we remain indifferent to a downtrodden, abused race?
 
AG.1903-08-19.003 Atlantic Union Gleaner 1903
                                    Our Only Hope.      God's law has lost none of its force. In his sight sin is still a hateful thing. Because we have sinned, we must personally bear the condemnation of the law, unless some one else, one in whom no taint of sin can be found, will bear the condemnation in our behalf. Without a substitute, we have no hope of pardon and salvation.
 
AG.1903-08-19.007
                              Justified by Faith.      Sinners are committed for trial. They must answer to the charge of transgressing God's law. Their only hope is to accept Christ, their  Substitute. He has redeemed the fallen race from the curse of the law, having been made sin--a curse--for mankind. Nothing but his grace is sufficient to free the transgressor from bondage. And by the grace of Christ all who are obedient to God's commandments are made free.
 
AU.1900-06-01.014  Australasian Union Conference Record 1900
      Christ has pledged Himself to be our substitute and surety, and He neglects no one. There is an inexhaustible fund of perfect obedience accruing from His obedience. In heaven His merits, His self-denial and self-sacrifice, are treasured as incense to be offered up with the prayers of His people. As the sinner's sincere, humble prayers ascend to the throne of God, Christ mingles with them the merits of His own life of perfect obedience. Our prayers are made fragrant by this incense. Christ has pledged Himself to intercede in our behalf, and the Father always hears His Son.
 
BE.1887-01-01.004  Bible Echo 1887
      In becoming man's substitute, and bearing the curse which should have fallen upon him, Christ pledged himself in behalf of the race to maintain the sacred claims and the exalted honor of his Father's law. The Father has given the world into the hands of his Son, that through his mediatorial work he may completely vindicate the holiness and the binding claims of every precept of the divine law. This is the work of Christ, to convince men of sin, which is the transgression of the law, and through his mediation to bring them back to the path of obedience.
 
BE.1889-01-15.009
      The God of the universe has given our cases in the Judgment into the hands of his Son, one who is acquainted with our infirmities, and knows that we are but dust. He has taken our nature upon him, and has himself felt the force of our temptations; he has borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows. When man rebelled, Christ became his surety and substitute. He undertook the combat with the powers of darkness; and when through death he destroyed him that had the power of death, the highest honors were bestowed upon him. He ascended up on high, he led captivity captive, and sat down at the right hand of God; --the very Jesus who had borne the curse of sin for us. And there was given him a name that is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow. To him God has delegated his power; he has the keys of death and the grave.
 
BE.1892-11-01.006
      But many say that Jesus was not like us, that He was not as we are in the world, that He was divine, and therefore we cannot overcome as He overcame. But this is not true; "for verily He took not on Him the nature of angels; but He took on Him the seed of Abraham. . . . For in that He Himself hath suffered, being tempted, He is able to succor them that are tempted." Christ knows the sinner's trials; He knows his temptations. He took upon Himself our nature; He was tempted in all points like as we are. He has wept, He was a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief. As a man He lived upon earth. As a man He ascended to heaven. As a man He is the substitute of humanity. As a man He liveth to make intercession for us. As a man He will come again with kingly power and glory to receive those who love Him, and for whom He is now preparing a place. We should rejoice and give thanks that God "hath appointed a day, in the which He will judge the world in righteousness, by that man whom He hath ordained."
 
BE.1893-03-15.003
      Jesus is our atoning sacrifice. We can make no atonement for ourselves; but by faith we can accept the atonement that has been made. "For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that He might bring us to God." "Ye were not redeemed with corruptible things, . . . but with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot." No man of earth, no angel of heaven, could have paid the penalty for sin. Jesus was the only one who could save rebellious man. In Him divinity and humanity are combined, and this was what gave efficacy to the offering on Calvary's cross. At the cross, mercy and truth met together; righteousness and peace kissed each other. As the sinner looks upon the Saviour dying on Calvary, and realizes that the Sufferer is divine, he asks why, this great sacrifice was made; and the cross points to the holy law of God, which has been transgressed. The death of Christ is an unanswerable argument to the immutability and righteousness of the law. In prophesying of Christ, Isaiah says, "He will magnify the law, and make it honourable." The law has no power to pardon the evil-doer. Its office is to point out his defects, that he may realize his need of One who is mighty to save, realize his need of One who will become his substitute, his surety, his righteousness. Jesus meets the need of the sinner; for He has taken upon Him the sins of the transgressor. "He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities; the chastisement of our peace was upon Him, and with his stripes we are healed." The Lord could have cut off the sinner, and utterly destroyed him; but the more costly plan was chosen. In his great love He provides hope for the hopeless, giving his only begotten Son to bear the sins of the world. And since He has poured out all heaven in that one rich gift, He will withhold from man no needed aid that he may take the cup of salvation, and become an heir of God, and joint-heir with Christ.
 
BE.1893-07-15.009
      In becoming man's substitute, in bearing the curse which should fall upon man, Christ has pledged Himself in behalf of the race to maintain the sacred and exalted honour of his Father's law. He came to convince men of sin, which is the transgression of the law, and through divine mediation, bring them back to obedience to God's commandments. God has given the world into the hands of Christ, that He may completely vindicate the binding claims of the law, and make manifest the holiness of every principle. Christ was the Father's "appointed heir of all things, by whom also He made the worlds." He was the "brightness of his glory, and the express image of his person." And He upheld "all things by the word of his power." He possessed divine excellence and greatness; and it pleased the Father that in Him all fulness should dwell. Christ exchanged the throne of light and glory which He had with the Father, counting it not a thing to be desired to be equal with God while man was lost in sin and misery. He came from heaven to earth, clothed his divinity with humanity, and bore the curse as surety for the fallen race. He was not compelled to do this; but He chose to bear the results of man's transgression, that man might escape eternal death.
 
BE.1893-12-01.008
      In the great battle fought between the Prince of light and the prince of darkness, Jesus gained the victory in behalf of humanity. Had Satan gained a degree of advantage, as he did with the first Adam, the human family would have been left under his control, and without one ray of hope they would have perished from the earth. But in behalf of the human race, Jesus conquered the fallen foe: Satan was vanquished. Through the victory of Christ, the human race was elevated in moral value, not because of anything they had done, but because of the great work that had been wrought out for them through the only begotten Son of God. As man's substitute and surety, in human nature, through divine power, Christ placed man on vantage ground. In believing on Him as our personal Saviour, we place ourselves under his blood-stained banner, and the wicked one cannot take us from under his standard, as long as we desire to prove loyal to Him who has died for us.
 
BE.1894-02-26.007
      Let us heed the message of the True Witness, given to us in warning. If we have sinned, "we have an Advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous." He, our substitute and surety, stands before the mercy-seat, pleading our cause in the courts of God. And in sympathy with their loved Commander, all the heavenly intelligences have an intense interest in all that concerns us. Will it not work us good to comprehend this fact, that the angels are commissioned to minister to all who shall be heirs of salvation, who are lawfully striving to win the crown of life?
 
BE.1894-03-26.003
      Those who receive Christ are melted and subdued by the manifestation of His love in His humiliation, suffering, and death in their behalf. They behold Him as their substitute and surety, as pledging Himself to accomplish their full salvation through a plan that is consistent with the justice of God, and which vindicates the honour of His law. But there are some who are stirred with strong emotion as they view the humiliation of Jesus, who shrink from following in His footsteps when they understand that they must be sharers in His humiliation and suffering. When Jesus asks the surrender of self without reserve, when He asks compliance with His government, and that they shall walk in humble obedience and implicit trust, their nature rebels. "No," says the proud heart; "we want to keep our independence." But this is the very thing that Jesus wants you to have. It was that you might be freed from the slavery of sin that He died on Calvary's cross. He died that through faith in Him, you might be free indeed, and stand fast in the glorious liberty of the children of God.
 
BE.1894-07-02.003
      All legalism, all the sorrow and woe by which you may encompass yourself, will not give you one moment of relief. You cannot rightly estimate sin. You must accept God's estimate, and it is heavy indeed. If you bore the guilt of your sin, it would crush you; but the sinless One has taken your place, and though undeserving, He has borne your guilt. By accepting the provision God has made, you may stand free before Him in the merit and virtue of your Substitute.
 
BE.1894-11-05.005
      We are not under a system of mere requirements, mere justice, and unsympathizing rigour. The penalty of transgressing the law has fallen upon our Substitute and Surety, and for a time has been suspended, so that the guilty do not feel its weight; but the object of this suspension is not to teach us that its claims are over, its exactions set aside, but to attract us to holiness, to obedience. Nothing is changed except the manner of bringing men to obey the law. Obey its claims we must. The first step toward obedience is repentance. We are to see the excellence of its requirements by beholding the wrong of disobedience.
 
BE.1899-05-01.008
      The great Intercessor presents His petition to the Father. No middle-man comes between the sinner and Christ. No dead prophet, no buried saint, is seen. Christ Himself is our advocate. All that the Father is to His Son, He is to those whom His Son in humanity represented. In every line of His work Christ acted as a representative of the Father. He lived as our substitute and surety. He laboured as He would have His followers labour, unselfishly appreciating the value of every human being for whom He suffered and died.                                                          Mrs. E. G. White.
 
BT.1908-02-01.002  Bible Training School 1908
      The Son of God in becoming man's substitute, and bearing the curse which should fall upon man, pledged Himself in behalf of the race, to maintain the honor of the law of God. The Father has given the world into the hands of Christ, that through His mediatorial work He may save the sinner, and completely vindicate the claims of the law. His mission was to convince men of sin,--which is the transgression of the law, and through the merits of His blood, and by His mediation. He was to bring them back to obedience. Through the sacrifice of Christ, the law could be maintained, and the sinner could be pardoned,--not only freed from the power of sin, but renewed "after the image of Him that created him." Col. 3:10.
 
BT.1915-09-01.004
      The working of the vigilant foe in presenting to Christ the vast proportions of transgression, caused such poignant pain, that He felt that He could not remain in the immediate presence of any human being. He could not bear that even His disciples should witness His agony as He contemplated the woe of the world. Even His most dearly loved friends must not be in His companionship. The sword of justice was unsheathed, and the wrath of God against iniquity rested upon man's substitute, Jesus Christ, the only begotten of the Father.
BT.1915-09-01.005
      In the garden of Gethsemane Christ suffered in man's stead, and the human nature of the Son of God staggered under the terrible horror of the guilt of sin, until from His pale and quivering lips was forced the agonizing cry, "O My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from Me:" but if there be no other way by which the salvation of man may be accomplished, then "not as I will, but as Thou wilt." Human nature would then and there have died under the horror of the sense of sin, had not an angel from heaven strengthened Him to bear the agony. The power that inflicted retributive justice upon man's substitute and surety, was the power that sustained and upheld the suffering One under the tremendous weight of wrath that would have fallen upon a sinful world. Christ was suffering the death that was pronounced upon the transgressors of God's law.
 
GCB.1899-10-01.018  General Conference Bulletins 1899
      Christ accepts the surrender of the soul. He has pledged himself to be our substitute and surety, and he neglects no one. There is an inexhaustible fund of perfect obedience accruing from his obedience. How is it that such an infinite treasure is not appreciated? In heaven the merits of Christ, his self-denial and self-sacrifice, are treasured up as incense, to be offered up with the prayers of his people. As sincere, humble prayers ascend to the throne of God, Christ mingles with them the merits of his life of perfect obedience. Our prayers are made fragrant by this incense. Christ has pledged himself to intercede in our behalf, and the Father always hears his Son. Pray then; pray without ceasing; an answer is sure to come. But let me speak in warning. If any man regard iniquity in his heart, the Lord will not hear him.
 
GCB.1901-04-23.004
      The Scriptures teach us to seek for the sanctification to God of body, soul, and spirit. In this work we are to be laborers together with God. Much may be done to restore the moral image of God in man, to improve the physical, mental, and moral capabilities. Great changes can be made in the physical system by obeying the laws of God and bringing into the body nothing that defiles. And while we can not claim perfection of the flesh, we may have Christian perfection of the soul. Through the sacrifice made in our behalf, sins may be perfectly forgiven. Our dependence is not in what man can do; it is in what God can do for man through Christ. When we surrender ourselves wholly to God, and fully believe, the blood of Christ cleanses from all sin. The conscience can be freed from condemnation. Through faith in his blood, all may be made perfect in Christ Jesus. Thank God that we are not dealing with impossibilities. We may claim sanctification. We may enjoy the favor of God. We are not to be anxious about what Christ and God think of us, but about what God thinks of Christ, our Substitute. Ye are accepted in the Beloved. The Lord shows, to the repenting, believing one, that Christ accepts the surrender of the soul, to be molded and fashioned after his own likeness.
 
MS.1893-04-12.002  Messenger
      In the council of heaven provision was made that man, though a transgressor, should not perish in his disobedience, but through faith in Christ as his substitute and surety might become the elect of God, predestinated unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to Himself, according to the good pleasure of his will. God wills that all men should be saved; and in giving his only begotten Son as man's ransom, He has made ample provision of the salvation of the world. None need perish unless they refuse to be adopted as children of God through Christ Jesus. Many permit pride to hinder them from accepting of the provisions of salvation. They will not consent to have the grace of Christ imparted to them through faith in his name; but human merit will not make man acceptable before God. No dependence can be placed upon their works; for without Christ they can do no good thing. The elect are those who are chosen through Christ unto sanctification of the spirit and belief of the truth. But God willeth not the misery of any one of his creatures; it is his desire that none should be lost, but all should come to repentance and to the acknowledging of the truth.
 
MS.1893-04-26.005
      The fallen race could be restored only through the merit of Him who was equal with God. Though so highly exalted, Christ consented to take upon Him human nature, that He might work in behalf of man, and reconcile to God his disloyal subject. Christ pleads his merit in our behalf. As our substitute and surety, He undertook to combat the powers of darkness in our behalf, and prevailed against the enemy of our souls, presenting to us the cup of salvation. The Prince of Life consented to bear insult and mockery, pain and death. Upon the cross of Calvary He paid redemption's price for a lost world. It was the world that He loved, the one lost sheep that He would bring back to his fold. The cross of Calvary speaks the amazing love of God for the sinner. He valued him at an infinite price, giving his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life. If the love of God fails to call forth a response from the human heart, if it fails to soften and subdue the soul, we are utterly lost. There is no reserve power through which to influence the sinner. Heaven's richest gift has been freely offered for our acceptance. No greater manifestation of God's love can be given than that which was given on Calvary's cross. If the love of Christ does not melt and subdue the heart, by what means can man be reached? Have you failed to respond to the pleadings of his Spirit? Then no longer fortify your heart in hardness. Open the door of the heart to receive Christ, the best gift of Heaven. Let not cruel unbelief influence you to refuse the heaven-sent guest. Let not Christ say of you, "Ye will not come unto Me that ye might have life." With loving entreaties He follows the sinner, pleading, "Turn ye, turn ye; for why will ye die?"                Mrs. E. G. White.
 
MS.1893-05-10.002
      Under the covenant of grace, the conditions of eternal life are precisely the same as those given to man in Eden. The believing sinner, through his divine substitute and surety, renders obedience to the law of God. Mercy granted to man is the reward of the merit of Christ, who gave Himself for us that He might redeem us from all iniquity, and "purify unto Himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works." Provision made for the salvation of men through the imputed righteousness of Christ, does not do away with good works, release us from our obligation to keep the law, nor lessen in the least its holy claim. Christ came to exalt the law and make it honourable, to reveal its exceeding breadth and changeless character. The glory of the gospel of grace is the imputed righteousness of Christ, providing a way of salvation through obedience to the law of God by the indwelling of the Holy Spirit.
 
PR.1909-01-28.006
      Where shall we find laws more noble, pure, and just than are exhibited on the statute-books that record the instruction given to Moses for the children of Israel? Through all time these laws are to be perpetuated, that the character of God's people may be formed after the divine similitude. The law is a wall of protection to those who are obedient to God's precepts. From what other source can we gather such strength, or learn such noble science? What other book will teach men to love, fear and obey God as does the Bible? What other book presents to students more ennobling science, more wonderful history? It clearly portrays righteousness, and foretells the consequences of disloyalty to the law of Jehovah. No one is left in darkness as to that which God approves or disapproves. In studying the Scriptures we become acquainted with God, and are led to understand our relation to Christ, who is the Sin-bearer, the Surety, the Substitute for our fallen race. These are truths that concern our present and eternal interest.
 
PT.1886-02-04.001 Present Truth (British) 1886
      It was not the dread of death which caused the inexpressible agony of Jesus. To believe this would be to place him beneath the martyrs in courage and endurance; for many of those who have died for their faith, yielded to torture and death, rejoicing that they were accounted worthy to suffer for Christ's sake Christ was the prince of sufferers; but it was not bodily anguish that filled him with horror and despair; it was a sense of the malignity of sin, a knowledge that man had become so familiar with sin that he did not realize its enormity, that it was so deeply rooted in the human heart as to be well-nigh impossible to eradicate. It was the guilt of sin, bringing the Father's wrath upon him as man's substitute, that broke the heart of the Son of God. Every pang that he endured upon the cross, the blood-drops that flowed from his head, his hands, and feet, the agony that racked his frame, and the unutterable anguish that filled his soul at the hiding of his Father's face, speak to man, saying, It is for love of thee that the Son of God consents to have these heinous crimes laid upon him; for thee he spoils the domain of death, and opens the gates of Paradise and immortal life. He who stilled the angry waves by his word, and walked the foam-capped billows, who made devils tremble, and disease flee from his touch, who opened the eyes of the blind, and raised the dead to life,--offers himself upon the cross as the all-sufficient sacrifice for man.
 
PT.1890-01-30.006
      Jesus is the only hope of the soul. By faith every soul may say with the Psalmist, "Whom have I in heaven but Thee? and there is none upon earth that I desire beside Thee." The moment the sinner lays hold of Christ by faith, his sins are no longer upon him. Christ stands in the sinner's place, and declares, "I have borne his guilt, I have been punished for his transgressions, I have taken his sins, and put My righteousness upon him." In Christ the sinner stands guiltless before the law. But how vain is the hope of entering heaven if we have no present faith in Christ, no delight in spiritual things, no joy in anticipating the joys of heaven. The child of God finds his comfort and peace in Christ. He delights to dwell upon the holiness of his future, immortal home. The Lord commands, "Be ye holy, for I am holy." The Christian's constant endeavour should be to come into perfect conformity to the life of Christ, we must look away from the darkness, and face the light. Do not, by your attitude of unbelief, charge God with partiality or unfaithfulness. Your doubt casts reflections upon the verity of His promises. When in living faith you come to Jesus, and become doers of His Word, you will taste and see that the Lord is good. You will say to all, "By His stripes we are healed." You will think of Jesus, you will talk of Jesus, as One who is willing and able to save to the uttermost all that come unto God by Him. If you believe in Christ as your Saviour, His perfect obedience is set to your account. You are pardoned as you look to Jesus as your substitute and surety. The promise of God is, "If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness."
 
SS.1895-11-01.003  Sabbath-School Worker 1895
      The plan of redemption is perfect in all its parts. It does not demerit or lessen the claims of the law of God in one jot or one tittle in saving the sinner from the just penalty of the law. Through the provision of the death of God's only-begotten Son in sinners' behalf, the immutability of the law of God is demonstrated for time and eternity. Justice honors the law of God in providing a substitute for the transgressor; for Christ gave his own life a ransom in order that God might be just and yet be the justifier of him who believes in Jesus. The work of saving the lost through the merit of Christ magnifies the law and harmonizes with every perfection of Jehovah. In the plan of salvation the highest honor is paid to the law of heaven's government, and yet mercy is freely dispensed to the fallen sons of Adam. Every believing soul, cooperating with the great Restorer, is blessed with heavenly grace, and endowed with the richest treasures of the glory of God. The imagination cannot picture anything more glorious than that which is attained through the plan of redemption. Well may we exclaim, "O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God!"
 
SS.1895-12-01.001
      Through the obedience of the Son of God, through his submission to bear the death penalty for human transgression, the law is magnified and made honorable before the universe. Angels, cherubim, seraphim, and worlds unfallen behold the honor of the law vindicated and exalted. Through the unfolding of the perfection of the divine nature they see the image of God restored to man and the honor of the divine government maintained. The wisdom of God has abounded towards all the sons and daughters of Adam. Christ laid down his life, shed his blood, suffered the death penalty for the sinner, and became the Sin Bearer for every repenting, believing soul. We see sin fully punished in the Substitute and the sinner fully saved through his merit. We see the law of God highly exalted, with no jot or tittle of its authority laid aside, while the transgressor, relying upon the merit of the Substitute, is justified by the law. Through the plan of salvation we see mercy and truth met together, righteousness and peace embracing each other. There is no vacillation in the principles of God's commandments, but they are pronounced by the angels of heaven, by the inhabitants of unfallen worlds, and by souls justified, as "holy, and just, and good."
 
WB.1902-09-09.006 Worker's Bulletin 1902
       Christ Our Righteousness.
      I am sorry that so many are doubtful in regard to justification by faith, and that some are standing in opposition to the light that God has given on this subject. Sinners are committed for trial. They must answer the charge of transgressing God's law. Their only hope is to accept Jesus Christ, their Substitute. He has redeemed the fallen race from the curse of the law, having been made sin,--a curse,--for them. Nothing but the grace of Christ is sufficient to free the transgressor from bondage. Through His grace those who are obedient to God's commandments are made free. If sinners repent their pardon is procured through the merits of Christ. Those who understand this matter in its true bearing will more fully comprehend the glorious, wondrous plan of salvation. They will not desire to argue just what is meant by Christ being our righteousness, nor will they desire to try to explain questions that do not in any way make more plain the terms of salvation. It is not essential to understand the precise particulars in regard to the relation of the two laws. It is of far greater consequence that we know whether we are justified or condemned by the holy precepts of God's law.
 
RH.1873-01-21.003  Advent Review and Sabbath Herald 1873
      Christ came not confessing his own sins; but guilt was imputed to him as the sinner's substitute. He came not to repent on his own account; but in behalf of the sinner. As man had transgressed the law of God, Christ was to fulfill every requirement of that law, and thus show perfect obedience. "Lo, I come to do thy will, O God!" Christ honored the ordinance of baptism by submitting to this rite. In this act he identified himself with his people as their representative and head. As their substitute, he takes upon him their sins, numbering himself with the transgressors, taking the steps the sinner is required to take, and doing the work the sinner must do. His life of suffering and patient endurance after his baptism were an example to converted sinners of what they should endure and patiently suffer in consequence of their transgressions and sins. John finally yielded to the request of Christ, notwithstanding his feelings of unworthiness to baptize him, and performed the service. He led the Saviour of the world down into the river Jordan in the presence of a large concourse of people, and buried him in the water.
 
RH.1874-02-24.021
      A council was held in Heaven, which resulted in God's dear Son undertaking to redeem man from the curse and from the disgrace of Adam's failure, and to conquer Satan. Oh, wonderful condescension! The Majesty of Heaven, through love and pity for fallen man, proposed to become his substitute and surety. He would bear man's guilt. He would take the wrath of his Father upon himself, which otherwise would have fallen upon man because of his disobedience.
 
RH.1874-03-03.001
      Fallen man, because of his guilt, could no longer come directly before God with his supplications, for his transgression of the divine law had placed an impassable barrier between the holy God and the transgressor. But a plan was devised that the sentence of death should rest upon a substitute of superior value to the law of God. In the plan of redemption there must be the shedding of blood, for death must come in consequence of man's sin. The beasts for sacrificial offerings were to prefigure Christ. In the slain victim, man was to see the fulfillment for the time being of God's word, "Ye shall surely die." And the flowing of the blood from the victim would also signify an atonement. There was no virtue in the blood of animals; but the shedding of the blood of beasts was to point forward to a Redeemer who would one day come to the world and die for the sins of men. And thus Christ would fully vindicate his Father's law.
 
RH.1874-08-18.002
      Christ did not appear to notice the reviling taunts of Satan. He was not provoked to give him proofs of his power. He meekly bore his insults without retaliation. The words spoken from Heaven at his baptism were very precious, evidencing to him that his Father approved the steps he was taking in the plan of salvation as man's substitute and surety. The opening heavens, and descent of the heavenly dove, were assurances that his Father would unite his power in Heaven with that of his Son upon the earth, to rescue man from the control of Satan, and that God accepted the effort of Christ to link earth to Heaven, and finite man to the infinite.
 
RH.1874-08-18.007
      The Saviour of the world became sin for the race. In becoming man's substitute, Christ did not manifest his power as the Son of God. He ranked himself among the sons of men. He was to bear the trial of temptation as a man, in man's behalf, under the most trying circumstances, and leave an example of faith and perfect trust in his Heavenly Father. Christ knew that his Father would supply him food when it would gratify him to do so. He would not in this severe ordeal, when hunger pressed him beyond measure, prematurely diminish one particle of the trial allotted to him by exercising his divine power.
 
RH.1874-08-18.012
      The exalted Son of God in assuming humanity draws himself nearer to man by standing as the sinner's substitute. He identifies himself with the sufferings and afflictions of men. He was tempted in all points as a man is tempted, that he might know how to succor those who should be tempted. Christ overcame on the sinner's behalf.
 
RH.1881-03-08.006
      Jesus, our substitute, consented to bear for man the penalty of the law transgressed. He clothed his divinity with humanity, and thus became the Son of man, a Saviour and Redeemer. The very fact of the death of God's dear Son to redeem man, shows the immutability of the divine law. How easily, from the transgressor's standpoint, could God have abolished his law, thus providing a way whereby men could be saved, and Christ remain in Heaven! The doctrine which teaches freedom, through grace, to break the law, is a fatal delusion. Every transgressor of God's law is a sinner, and none can be sanctified while living in known sin.
 
RH.1882-07-11.015
      In the word of God the mind finds subjects for the deepest thought, the loftiest aspirations. Here we may hold communion with patriarchs and prophets, and listen to the voice of the Eternal as he speaks with men. Here we behold the Majesty of Heaven, as he humbled himself to become our substitute and surety, to cope singlehanded with the powers of darkness, and to gain the victory in our behalf. A reverent contemplation of such themes as these cannot fail to soften, purify, and ennoble the heart, and at the same time to inspire the mind with new strength and vigor.
 
RH.1884-08-19.011
      In the word of God we find subject for the deepest thought; its truths arouse to the loftiest aspiration. Here we hold communion with patriarchs and prophets, and listen to the voice of the Eternal as he speaks with men. Here we behold what the angels contemplate with wonder,--the Son of God, as he humbled himself to become our substitute and surety, to cope single-handed with the powers of darkness, and to gain the victory in our behalf.
 
RH.1885-02-17.018
      No deep-seated love for Jesus can dwell in the heart that does not see and realize its own sinfulness. The soul that is transformed by grace will admire his divine character; but if we do not see our own moral deformity, it is unmistakable evidence that we have not had a view of the beauty and excellence of Christ. The less we see to esteem in ourselves, the more we shall see to esteem in the infinite purity and loveliness of our Saviour. A view of our own sinfulness drives us to Him who can pardon. Jesus will accept us; for his word is pledged. As our substitute, he takes our guilt on his own soul, and imputes his righteousness to the sinner. When the soul, realizing its helplessness, reaches out after Christ, he will reveal himself in power. The more our sense of need drives us to him and to the word of God, the more enlarged views we shall have of his character, and the more fully we shall reflect his image,--show in our own lives the excellence of his character.
 
RH.1886-03-02.008
      Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, and all the patriarchs and prophets, heard the gospel through Christ; they saw the salvation of the race through the substitute and surety, Jesus, the world's Redeemer. They saw a Saviour to come to the world in human flesh, and communed with him in his divine majesty. Abraham walked and talked with the heavenly angels who came to him in the garb of humanity. Jacob talked with Christ and angels. Moses held converse with Jesus face to face as one who speaketh with a friend.
 
RH.1887-04-19.012
      Jesus endured the painful fast in our behalf, and conquered Satan in every temptation, thus making it possible for man to conquer in his own behalf, and on his own account, through the strength brought to him by this mighty victory gained as man's substitute and surety. We thank the Lord that a victory was gained upon these points, even here in Basel; and we hope to carry our brethren and sisters up to a still higher standard to sign the pledge to abstain from Java coffee and the herb that comes from China. We see that there are some who need to take this step in reform. There are some who are nervous, and they should abstain from these nerve-weakening narcotics, that they may place themselves in right relation to the laws of life and health. These injurious stimulants are doing great harm to their nervous system. The machinery of nature is aroused to unwonted activity to be followed by reaction, and the coffee and tea must be used by them to keep up their strength and again urge up their powers. Unnatural activity is the result, and by this continual course of indulgence of appetite the natural vigor of the constitution becomes gradually and imperceptibly impaired. If we would preserve a healthy action of all the powers of the system, nature must not be forced to unnatural action. Nature will stand at her post of duty, and do her work wisely and efficiently, if the false props that have been brought in to take the place of nature are expelled.
 
RH.1887-07-05.008
      Christ was to die as man's substitute. Man was a criminal under the sentence of death for transgression of the law of God as a traitor, a rebel; hence a substitute for man must die as a malefactor, because he stood in the place of the traitors, with all their treasured sins upon his divine soul. It was not enough that Jesus should die in order to fully meet the demands of the broken law, but he died a shameful death. The prophet gives to the world his words, "I hid not my face from shame and spitting."
 
RH.1888-02-14.012
      When man placed himself in opposition to the will of the Father, infinite pity filled the breast of the Son of God. He offered his life to pay the penalty of the broken law, that man might have another trial. He promised to give those who believed in him grace to resist temptation, and power to build up a righteous character, through keeping the commandments of God. Our Saviour purchased this privilege for us at an infinite cost. How blind must man be to his own interests, that he does not accept the terms of God, and receive eternal life! It is a solemn thought that the condition of man required the sacrifice of the Son of God in order that he might be redeemed from a life of sin to a life of faith and obedience. Though the race has fallen in rebellion, and ruin awaits those who neglect so great a salvation, Christ has promised to "make a man more precious than fine gold; even a man than the golden wedge of Ophir." This honor will be conferred upon man, because the Son of God, as his substitute and surety, has imparted to him his own righteousness. Our precious Saviour laid aside his royal robes, stepped down from his royal throne, and was made man, that he might bring man into harmony with his God.
 
RH.1888-02-28.005
      When Christ bowed on the banks of Jordan, after his baptism, the heavens were opened, and the Spirit descended in the form of a dove, like burnished gold, and encircled him with its glory; and the voice of God from the highest heaven was heard, saying. "This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased." The prayer of Christ in man's behalf opened the gates of heaven, and the father had responded, accepting the petition for the fallen race. Jesus prayed as our substitute and surety, and now the human family may find access to the Father through the merits of his well-beloved Son. This earth because of transgression had been struck off from the continent of heaven. Communication had ceased between man and his Maker; but the way has been opened, so that he may return to the Father's house. Jesus is "the way, the truth, and the life." The gate of heaven has been left ajar, and the radiance from the throne of God shines into the hearts of those who love him, even though they dwell in the sin-cursed earth. The light that encircled the divine Son of God will fall upon the pathway of all those who follow in his footsteps. There is no reason for discouragement. The promises of God are sure and steadfast.
 
RH.1888-07-17.011
      Those who are teaching the most solemn message ever given to the world, should discipline the mind to comprehend its significance. The theme of redemption will bear the most concentrated study, and its depth will never be fully explored. You need not fear that you will exhaust this wonderful theme. Drink deep of the well of salvation. Go to the fountain for yourself, that you may be filled with refreshment, that Jesus may be in you a well of water, springing up unto everlasting life. Only Bible truth and Bible religion will stand the test of the judgment. We are not to pervert the word of God to suit our convenience and worldly interest, but to honestly inquire, "What wilt thou have me to do?" "Ye are not your own, for ye are bought with a price." And what a price! Not "with corruptible things, as silver and gold," "but with the precious blood of Christ.' When man was lost, the Son of God said, I will redeem him, I will become his surety and substitute. He laid aside his royal robes, clothed his divinity with humanity, stepped down from the royal throne, that he might reach the very depth of human woe and temptation, lift up our fallen natures, and make it possible for us to be overcomers,--the sons of God, the heirs of the eternal kingdom. Shall we then allow any consideration of earth to turn us away from the path of truth? Shall we not challenge every doctrine and theory, and put it to the test of God's word?
 
RH.1888-07-24.004
      To-day let the question come home to the heart of every one who professes the name of Christ, "Dost thou believe in the Son of God?" Not, "Do you admit that Jesus is the Redeemer of the world?" Not to soothe your conscience and the consciences of others by saying, "I believe," and think that is all there is to be done. But do you believe with all your heart that Jesus is your Saviour? Do you bring him into your life, and weave him into your character, until you are one with Christ? Many accept Jesus as an article of belief, but they have no saving faith in him as their sacrifice and Saviour. They have no realization that Christ has died to save them from the penalty of the law which they have transgressed, in order that they may be brought back to loyalty to God. Do you believe that Christ, as your substitute, pays the debt of your transgression? Not, however, that you may continue in sin, but that you may be saved from your sins; that you, through the merits of his righteousness, may be re-instated to the favor of God. Do you know that a holy and just God will accept your efforts to keep his law, through the merits of his own beloved Son who died for your rebellion and sin?
 
RH.1888-07-24.014
      How bitterly do many of the ministers who stand in the sacred desk denounce the royal law of God, and many of them profess to be wholly sanctified to his service. They are of the class who break the law, and teach others to do the same; but does not Jesus say, "Whosoever shall break one of the least of these commandments and teach men so, he shall be called the least in the kingdom of heaven?" The True Witness presents encouragements to all who are seeking to walk in the path of humble obedience, through faith in his name. He declares, "To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne." These are the words of our Substitute and Surety. He who is the divine Head of the church, the mightiest of conquerors, would point his followers to his life, his toils, his self-denials, his struggles, and sufferings, through contempt,through rejection, ridicule, scorn, insult, mockery, falsehood, up the path of Calvary to the scene of the crucifixion, that they might be encouraged to press on toward the mark for the prize and reward of the overcomer. Victory is assured through faith and obedience. Let us make an application of the words of Christ to our own individual cases. Are we poor, and blind, and wretched, and miserable? Then let us seek the gold and white raiment that he offers. The work of overcoming is not restricted to the age of the martyrs. The conflict is for us, in these days of subtle temptation to worldliness, to self-security, to indulgence of pride, covetousness, false doctrines, and immorality of life. "By their fruits ye shall know them," and every church is to bear the test of God's law. Shall we stand before the proving of God?
 
RH.1888-08-21.014
      There are but few who have an appreciation of the grievous character of sin, and who comprehend the greatness of the ruin that has resulted from the transgression of God's law. By examining the wonderful plan of redemption to restore the sinner to the moral image of God, we see that the only means for man's deliverance was wrought out by the self-sacrifice, and the unparalleled condescension and love of the Son of God. He alone had the strength to fight the battles with the great adversary of God and man, and, as our substitute and surety, he had given power to those who lay hold of him by faith, to become victors in his name, and through his merits.
 
RH.1888-08-21.015
      We can see in the cross of Calvary what it has cost the Son of God to bring salvation to a fallen race. As the sacrifice in behalf of man was complete, so the restoration of man from the defilement of sin must be thorough and complete. The law of God has been given to us, that we may have rules to govern our conduct. There is no act of wickedness that the law will excuse; there is no unrighteousness that will escape its condemnation. The life of Christ is a perfect fulfillment of every precept of this law. He says, "I have kept my Father's commandments." The knowledge of the law would condemn the sinner, and crush hope from his breast, if he did not see Jesus as his substitute and surety, ready to pardon his transgression, and to forgive his sin. When, through faith in Jesus Christ, man does according to the very best of his ability, and seeks to keep the way of the Lord, by obedience to the ten commandments, the perfection of Christ is imputed to cover the transgression of the repentant and obedient soul.
 
RH.1888-10-09.013
      There is no argument in favor of the unchangeable character of God's law, so forcible as that presented in the cross of Calvary. If God could have altered one precept of his law to meet man in his fallen condition, then Christ need not have died. But the fact that the Son of God must become man's substitute and sacrifice, in order to atone for his transgression, proves the immutable nature of the law of Jehovah. Do you believe in Jesus as the Saviour of the world? Do you believe in him as your Saviour? He came not to destroy the law, but to fulfill it. He came to "save his people from their sins;" and "sin is the transgression of the law." "He that saith, I know him, and keepeth not his commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him. But whoso keepeth his word, in him verily is the love of God perfected: hereby know we that we are in him." "He that loveth me not keepeth not my sayings: and the word which ye hear is not mine, but the Father's which sent me." "By this we know that we love the children of God, when we love God, and keep his commandments. For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments: and his commandments are not grievous."
 
RH.1889-07-16.006
      After the temptation, it seemed as if the Son of God would die on the field of conflict; but the angels ministered unto him, and he was revived. He became our surety and substitute, and he can be "touched with the feeling of our infirmities," for he "was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin." How is it that men can make their hearts like adamant, and not be moved by the love of Christ? Through the merit of Christ's blood, every one can be a conqueror. Jesus has brought moral power to combine with human effort, whereby we may obtain the victory. Christ is our helper, and he invites us to take hold of his strength, and we shall make peace with him. In our conscious weakness we are to lay hold of his merit, and we may become triumphant through the grace of the Man of Nazareth.
 
RH.1890-06-10.004
      This earth was the field of battle; here the Son of God had to contend with the wily foe in our behalf. Behold him on Jordan's bank just before he entered the desert of temptation. He offered up a prayer such as heaven never heard before, and the heavens opened and the Spirit of God, like a dove of burnished gold, encircled the Son of God, and there was heard a voice, saying, "This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased." Do you comprehend all that this scene signifies? It tells you that heaven is opened before you, and that your petitions will find access to the Father. After the transgression of Adam, God no longer communicated directly with man; earth was separated, as it were, from the continent of heaven; but Jesus was made our substitute, our surety, that he might bring us back to the Father, and his human arm encircles the race, while his infinite arm reaches to the highest heavens, and thus he unites finite man to the infinite God, and connects earth with heaven. The voice that came from heaven to our Surety, tells us that heaven's portals are open and God hears our prayers, and that the light that enshrouded the Son of God will be over us if we follow in his way.
 
RH.1890-06-10.005
      Christ passed from this scene of glory to one of the greatest temptation. He went into the wilderness, and there Satan met him, and tempted him on the very points where man will be tempted. Our Substitute and Surety passed over the ground where Adam stumbled and fell. And the question was, Will he stumble and fall as Adam did over God's commandments? He met Satan's attacks again and again with, "It is written," and Satan left the field of conflict a conquered foe. Christ has redeemed Adam's disgraceful fall, and has perfected a character of perfect obedience, and left an example for the human family, that they may imitate the Pattern. He had failed on one point in reference to the law of God, he would not have been a perfect offering; for it was on one point only that Adam failed.
 
RH.1890-06-10.009
      Jesus withstood all the temptations of Satan, and through Christ we may withstand them. Through Jesus we may overcome the love for earthly treasures. Our Saviour withstood on every point the test of temptation, and in this way he has made it possible for man to overcome. Now, there is enough in this idea, in this thought, to fill our hearts with gratitude every day of our lives. As Jesus was accepted as our substitute and surety, every one of us will be accepted if we stand the test and trial for ourselves. He took our nature that he might become acquainted with the trials wherewith man should be beset, and he is our mediator and intercessor before the Father.
 
RH.1890-07-01.010
      Through Christ, restoration as well as reconciliation is provided for man. The gulf that was made by sin has been spanned by the cross of Calvary. A full, complete ransom has been paid by Jesus, by virtue of which the sinner is pardoned, and the justice of the law is maintained. All who believe that Christ is the atoning sacrifice may come and receive pardon for their sins; for through the merit of Christ, communication has been opened between God and man. God can accept me as his child, and I can claim him and rejoice in him as my loving Father. We must center our hopes of heaven upon Christ alone, because he is our substitute and surety. We have transgressed the law of God, and by the deeds of the law shall no flesh be justified. The best efforts that man in his own strength can make, are valueless to meet the holy and just law that he has transgressed; but through faith in Christ he may claim the righteousness of the Son of God as all-sufficient. Christ satisfied the demands of the law in his human nature. He bore the curse of the law for the sinner, made an atonement for him, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. Genuine faith appropriates the righteousness of Christ, and the sinner is made an overcomer with Christ; for he is made a partaker of the divine nature, and thus divinity and humanity are combined.
 
RH.1890-11-04.006
      Without the grace of Christ, the sinner is in a hopeless condition; nothing can be done for him; but through divine grace, supernatural power is imparted to the man, and works in mind and heart and character. It is through the impartation of the grace of Christ that sin is discerned in its hateful nature, and finally driven from the soul temple. It is through grace that we are brought into fellowship with Christ, to be associated with him in the work of salvation. Faith is the condition upon which God has seen fit to promise pardon to sinners; not that there is any virtue in faith whereby salvation is merited, but because faith can lay hold of the merits of Christ, the remedy provided for sin. Faith can present Christ's perfect obedience instead of the sinner's transgression and defection. When the sinner believes that Christ is his personal Saviour, then, according to his unfailing promises, God pardons his sin, and justifies him freely. The repentant soul realizes that his justification comes because Christ, as his substitute and surety, has died for him, is his atonement and righteousness.
 
RH.1891-03-10.003
      Those who do neglect the great gift of salvation, will have no second probation provided for them, but will be left without hope. The Son of the infinite God was the author of our salvation. He covenanted from the first to be man's substitute, and he became man that he might take upon himself the wrath which sin had provoked. The plan of redemption called forth the amazement of the heavenly hosts. The angels looked with wonder to see the mystery wrought out before them in the life of the Son of God. They saw the Redeemer take step after step down the path of humiliation. They saw him rejected, denied, insulted, abused, and crucified, and yet it was something beyond all finite intelligence to comprehend the full mystery of redemption.
 
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      The divine Author of salvation left nothing incomplete in the plan; every phase of it is perfect. The sin of the whole world was laid upon Jesus, and divinity gave its highest value to the suffering of humanity in Jesus, that the whole world might be pardoned through faith in the Substitute. The most guilty need have no fear but that God will pardon, for because of the efficacy of the divine sacrifice the penalty of the law will be remitted. Through Christ the sinner may return to allegiance to God. How wonderful is the plan of redemption in its simplicity and fullness. It not only provides for the full pardon of the sinner, but also for the restoration of the transgressor, making a way whereby he may be accepted as a son of God. Through obedience he may be the possessor of love and peace and joy. His faith may unite him in his weakness to Christ, the source of divine strength; and through the merits of Christ he may find the approval of God, because Christ has satisfied the demands of the law, and he imputes his righteousness to the penitent, believing soul. The spotless robe woven in the loom of heaven, covers the contrite one, and he wills to be obedient, taking the yoke of Christ, suffering as Christ suffered when he walked a man among men.
 
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      Every eye in the unfallen universe is bent upon those who profess to be Christ's followers. Here, in this atom of a world, an earnest warfare is going on,--a battle in which Christ, our substitute and surety, has engaged in our behalf, and conquered. Now we, Christ's purchased possession, must become soldiers of his cross, and conquer in our own behalf, on our own account, through the power and wisdom given us from above. The influence of the cross of Calvary is to vanquish every earthly and spiritual evil power; and we need to know the plan of the battle, that we may work in harmony with Christ.
 
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      The highest angel in heaven had not the power to pay the ransom for one lost soul. Cherubim and seraphim have only the glory with which they are endowed by the Creator as his creatures, and the reconciliation of man to God could be accomplished only through a mediator who was equal with God, possessed of attributes that would dignify, and declare him worthy to treat with the Infinite God in man's behalf, and also represent God to a fallen world. Man's substitute and surety must have man's nature, a connection with the human family whom he was to represent, and, as God's ambassador, he must partake of the divine nature, have a connection with the Infinite, in order to manifest God to the world, and be a mediator between God and man.
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      These qualifications were found alone in Christ. Clothing his divinity with humanity, he came to earth to be called the Son of man and the Son to God. He was the surety for man, the ambassador for God,--the surety for man to satisfy by his righteousness in man's behalf the demands of the law, and the representative of God to make manifest his character to a fallen race.
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      The world's Redeemer possessed the power to draw men to himself, to quiet their fears, to dispel their gloom, to inspire them with hope and courage, to enable them to believe in the willingness of God to receive them through the merits of the divine Substitute. As subjects of the love of God we ever should be grateful that we have a mediator, an advocate, an intercessor in the heavenly courts, who pleads in our behalf before the Father.
 
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      He who opens the Scriptures, and feeds upon the heavenly manna, becomes a partaker of the divine nature. He has no life or experience apart from Christ. He hears the voice of God speaking from heaven, "This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased." That voice is assurance to him that he is accepted in the Beloved. And he knows that in character he must be like him with whom God is well pleased. God has fully accepted Christ as our substitute, our surety; then let every one who names the name of Christ depart from all iniquity, and be one with Christ in character, that Jesus may not be ashamed to call us brethren. He in whom we trust has proved himself a present help in every time of need; and as we dwell with him, we grow more and more into his image. "We all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image, from glory to glory [which means from character to character], even as by the Spirit of the Lord." "For God who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ."
 
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      As Jesus looked upon the world, he saw such misapprehension of the character of God, such darkness covering the earth, and gross darkness the people, that his heart was drawn out in compassion for mankind. "God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." Jesus came to plant the cross between heaven and earth, between divinity and humanity. There he offered himself to God as a lamb without blemish, a spotless sacrifice for the sins of men. What means it that the divine Victim hangs there in dying agony?--It means that not one jot or tittle of the law could be set aside to save the transgressor of law, for whom Christ became substitute and surety. Christ consented to become man's sacrifice on Calvary's cross, and in him divine justice and mercy met together, so that God could pardon the transgressor, and vindicate his justice, and uphold his throne in righteousness.
 
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      It is by beholding Christ upon the cross of Calvary that the sinner is drawn to his Saviour; and as he realizes that Christ has died for him, his heart is melted into contrition and tenderness. He repents toward God because he has transgressed the divine law, and he has faith toward our Lord Jesus Christ as his substitute and surety.
 
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      The only definition the Bible gives of sin is that it is "the transgression of the law." While we are to repent toward God for the transgression of the law, we are not to look to the law for remission of sins, or for justification. Neither are we to imagine that repentance for past sin will be all-sufficient; for in order to be saved, we must have faith in our Lord Jesus Christ. When we accept Christ as our sacrifice, our substitute, our righteousness, then we behold the Father in a different light from that in which too many have regarded him in the past. We have blamed the Father for our sufferings. In ignorance and blindness to his infinite love, our hearts have been full of murmuring toward him; for the enemy had cast his shadow athwart our pathway, and clothed God with his own satanic character. But Christ came to reveal the Father, to roll back the shadow that Satan had cast over humanity, that men might behold God clothed in the divine attributes of his nature.
 
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      John says, "Behold, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God." No language can express this love; we can describe but a faint degree of love that passeth knowledge. It would require the language of the Infinite to express the love that has made it possible for us to be called the sons of God. In becoming a Christian, a man does not step down. There is no shame in having connection with the living God. Jesus bore the humiliation and shame and reproach that justly belonged to the sinner. He was the Majesty of heaven, he was the King of glory, he was equal with the Father; and yet he clothed his divinity with humanity, that humanity might touch humanity, that divinity might lay hold of divinity. Had he come as an angel, he could not have been a partaker with us of our sufferings, could not have been tempted in all points like as we are, he could not have sympathized with our sorrows; but he came in the garb of our humanity, that as our substitute and surety, he might overcome the prince of darkness in our behalf, and make us victors through his merits. Standing under the shadow of the cross of Calvary, the inspiration of his love fills our hearts. When I look upon Him whom my sins have pierced, the inspiration from on high comes upon me; and this inspiration may come upon each one of you through the Holy Spirit. Unless you receive the Holy Spirit, you cannot have the love of God in the soul; but through a living connection with Christ, we are inspired with love and zeal and earnestness. We are not as a block of marble, which may reflect the light of the sun, but cannot be imbued with life. We are capable of responding to the bright beams of the Sun of righteousness; for as Christ illuminates our souls, he gives light and life. We drink in the love of Christ as the branch draws nourishment from the vine. If we are grafted into Christ, if fiber by fiber we have been united with the living Vine, we shall give evidence of this fact by bearing rich clusters of fruit. If we are connected with light, we shall be channels of light, and in our words and works we shall reflect light to the world. Those who are truly Christians, grasp the golden chain which links earth to heaven, which binds finite man to the infinite God. The light that shineth in the face of Jesus, shines in the hearts of his followers, to the glory of God.
 
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      The only way in which the fallen race could be restored was through the gift of his Son, equal with himself, possessing the attributes of God. Though so highly exalted, Christ consented to assume human nature, that he might work in behalf of man and reconcile to God his disloyal subject. When man rebelled, Christ pleaded his merit in his behalf, and became man's substitute and surety. He undertook to combat the powers of darkness in man's behalf, and he prevailed, conquering the enemy of our souls, and presenting to man the cup of salvation.
 
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      Christ has not been presented in connection with the law as a faithful and merciful High Priest, who was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. He has not been lifted up before the sinner as the divine sacrifice. His work as sacrifice, substitute, and surety, has been only coldly and casually dwelt upon; but this is what the sinner needs to know. It is Christ in his fullness as a sin-pardoning Saviour, that the sinner must see; for the unparalleled love of Christ, through the agency of the holy Spirit, will bring conviction and conversion to the hardened heart. It is the divine influence that is the savor of the salt in the Christian. Many present the doctrines and theories of our faith; but their presentation is as salt without savor; for the holy Spirit is not working through their faithless ministry. They have not opened the heart to receive the grace of Christ; they know not the operation of the Spirit; they are as meal without leaven; for there is no working principle in all their labor, and they fail to win souls to Christ. They do not appropriate the righteousness of Christ; it is a robe unworn by them, a fullness unknown, a fountain untouched.
 
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      In his humanity Christ was tried with as much greater temptation, with as much more persevering energy than man is tried by the evil one, as his nature was greater than man's. This is a deep mysterious truth, that Christ is bound to humanity by the most sensitive sympathies. The evil works, the evil thoughts, the evil words of every son and daughter of Adam press upon his divine soul. The sins of men called for retribution upon himself; for he had become man's substitute, and took upon him the sins of the world. He bore the sins of every sinner; for all transgressions were imputed unto him, though "he did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth." Though the guilt of sin was not his, his Spirit was torn and bruised by the transgressions of men.
 
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      Men are contaminated with sin, and they cannot have an adequate conception of the heinous character of the evil which they cherish. Because of sin, the Majesty of heaven was stricken, smitten of God and afflicted. Voluntarily our divine substitute bared his soul to the sword of justice, that we might not perish, but have everlasting life. Said Christ: "I lay down my life that I might take it again. No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again." No man of earth nor angel of heaven could have paid the penalty of sin. Jesus was the only one who could save rebellious man. In him divinity and humanity were combined, and this was what gave efficiency to the sacrifice made on Calvary's cross. Here it was that mercy and truth met together, righteousness and peace kissed each other.
 
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      Will those who profess to believe the truth listen to the words of Jesus? He has said, "I am come that ye might have life, and that ye might have it more abundantly." "I am the bread of life." "I am the good Shepherd, and I lay down my life for the sheep." Will those who are called by his name believe that the children of God are very precious in his sight? Let us consider what the lord has done for us. Shall not the love manifested toward us be appreciated, shall it not be permitted to melt our hearts, to humble our pride to the dust? Such was the breadth and length and height and depth of the Saviour's love, that he willingly laid aside his honor, his high command in heaven, and clothed his divinity with humanity, in order that he might become man's substitute and surety. .
 
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      Concerning the advent of the Holy Spirit, Jesus said, "It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you." Now read carefully, that you may discern what is the work of the Holy Spirit. "And when he is come, he will reprove the world of sin, and of righteousness, and of judgment: of sin, because they believed not on me." If they do not believe on Jesus as a personal Saviour, they have no promise of salvation; for it is through faith in Christ alone that there is hope for the lost. "Of righteousness, because I go to my Father, and ye see me no more." From the time he ascended to his Father, he has represented man, as his surety and substitute. The Father looks upon the Son in the perfection of his character, as one who has borne the penalty for sin, and has wrought perfect righteousness for the repenting soul, and he is reconciled to all who believe in Christ as one fully able to save from sin.
 
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      "And he [the Lord Jesus Christ] answered and spake unto those that stood before him [his holy attending angels], saying, Take away the filthy garments from him." And to Joshua he said, "Behold, I have caused thine iniquity to pass from thee, and I will clothe thee with change of raiment." Jesus has borne the sins of the whole world, he suffered as man's substitute and surety. He has himself bridged the gulf that sin has made, that separated man from God, and earth from heaven. With his own divine hand he plucked the brand from the burning, that man might not die the second death.
 
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      Let us heed the message of the true witness given in warning to us. Let us seek to realize that the heavenly assembly are looking upon us, are witnesses to all our words and works. Will it not be wise for us to contemplate heavenly realities? Will it not work us good to comprehend the fact that heaven exists as really as does the earth, that the angels of heaven are interested in all transactions of earth, and are commissioned to minister to all who shall be heirs of salvation, who are lawfully striving to win the crown of life? If we bear the test and proving of God, we shall be counted worthy to be members of the royal family, children of the heavenly King. Jesus, our substitute and surety, is pleading our cases as an able substitute in the courts of God.
 
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      God has a church, a chosen people, and could all see as I have seen, how closely Christ identifies himself with his people, no such message would be heard as the one that denounces the church as Babylon. God has a people who are laborers together with him, and they have gone straightforward, having his glory in view. Listen to the prayer of our representative in heaven: "Father, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory." O, how the divine Head longed to have his church with him! They had fellowship with him in his suffering and humiliation, and it is his highest joy to have them with him to be partakers of his glory. Christ claims the privilege of having his church with him. "I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am." To have them with him is according to covenant promise and agreement with his Father. He reverently presents at the mercyseat his finished redemption for his people. The bow of promise encircles our substitute and surety as he pours out his petition of love, "Father, I will that they also whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory." We shall behold the King in his beauty, and the church will be glorified.
 
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      In the great battle fought between the Prince of light and the prince of darkness, Jesus gained the victory in behalf of humanity. Had Satan gained a degree of advantage, as he did with the first Adam, the human family would have been left under his control, and without one ray of hope they would have perished from the earth. But in behalf of the human race, Jesus conquered the fallen foe; Satan was vanquished. Through the victory of Christ, the human race was elevated in moral value, not because of anything they had done, but because of the great work that had been wrought out for them through the only begotten Son of God. As man's substitute and surety, in human nature through divine power, Christ placed man on vantage-ground. In believing on him as our personal Saviour, we place ourselves under his blood-stained banner, and the wicked one cannot take us from under his standard as long as we desire to prove loyal to Him who has died for us.
 
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      There always have been and always will be two classes on the earth to the end of time,--the believers in Jesus, and those who reject him. Sinners, however wicked, abominable, and corrupt, by faith in him will be purified, made clean, through the doing of his word. The truth will be a savor of life unto life to those who believe, but the same truth will be to the unbeliever a savor of death unto death. Those who reject Christ and refuse to believe the truth, will be filled with bitterness against those who accept Jesus as a personal Saviour. But those who receive Christ are melted and subdued by the manifestation of his love in his humiliation, suffering, and death in their behalf. They behold him as their substitute and surety, as pledging himself to accomplish their full salvation through a plan that is consistent with the justice of God, and which vindicates the honor of his law. The presentation of the love of God has a convincing power above that of argument, controversy, and debate, and drops the seed of gospel truth in the heart. The fact that Jesus, innocent and pure, should suffer, that God should lay all his wrath upon the head of his dear Son, that the guiltless should bear the punishment of the guilty, the just endure the penalty of sin for the unjust, breaks the heart; and as Jesus is lifted up, conviction strikes to the soul, and the love that prompted the bestowal of the infinite gift of Christ, constrains the sinner to surrender all to God.
 
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      "To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne." These are the words of our Substitute and Surety, the divine Head of the Church, himself the mightiest of conquerors. He points his disciples to his own life, to the tests he bore, to his self-denials and struggles and sufferings, and marks out the path of obedience for their feet through ridicule, contempt, scorn, mockery, rejection, and shameful death. Suffering and humiliation he bore in order to prove obedient to the law of God, to magnify the law and make it honorable; and he lays down the conditions that must be met by those who would inherit eternal life. Victory can come alone through faith and obedience, through following in his footsteps. The work of overcoming is not confined to the martyrs. We, too, are to engage in the conflict in these days of subtle temptation to worldliness, to self-confidence, pride, covetousness, and immorality; and to the overcomers will be given a crown of life and glory.
 
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      Christ took humanity upon him. He was our substitute and surety. He said, "Verily, verily, I say unto you, The Son can do nothing of himself, but what he seeth the Father do; for what things soever he doeth, these also doeth the Son likewise. . . . For the Father loveth the Son, and showeth him all things that himself doeth; and he will show him greater works than these; that ye may marvel. For as the Father raiseth up the dead, and quickeneth them; even so the Son quickeneth whom he will."
 
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      Christ is our substitute and surety; he stands before God in the place of humanity, and he is affected as his weakest follower is affected. The sympathy of Christ is such that he cannot be an indifferent spectator of his children's sufferings. The heart of him who gave his life for humanity is touched by the wound, however slight, that is given to one of his followers by the spirit revealed in the word or action of another. Let us bear in mind that Christ is the great central heart from which the life-blood flows to every part of the great body of humanity. He is the head from which extend the nerves that reach even to the most minute and most remote parts of the body. When one member of the body with which Christ is so mystically connected, suffers, the throb of pain is felt by our Saviour.
 
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      But while Christ pronounced a woe upon those who did not repent at his preaching, he had a word of encouragement for the lowly: "At that time Jesus answered and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes. Even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight." Many of the colored people are among the lowly who will receive the word of God, and shall not this long-neglected work of enlightening the colored people be entered into perseveringly, and be carried forward all the more diligently because it has been so long neglected? We must do a work for the colored race that has not yet been done. "God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him might not perish, but have everlasting life." The Son of God, the Creator of the world, sacrificed his own life, in order that he might become the Redeemer of fallen humanity. He made an infinite sacrifice, that he might become man's surety and substitute, and shall we remain indifferent to a downtrodden, abused race?
 
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      Where shall we find laws more noble, pure, and just, than are exhibited on the statute-books wherein is recorded instruction given to Moses for the children of Israel? Through all time these laws are to be perpetuated, that the character of God's people may be formed after the divine similitude. The law is a wall of protection to those who are obedient to God's precepts. From what other source can we gather such strength, or learn such noble science? What other book will teach men to love, fear, and obey God as does the Bible? What other book presents to students more ennobling science, more wonderful history? It clearly portrays righteousness, and foretells the consequence of disloyalty to the law of Jehovah. No one is left in darkness as to that which God approves or disapproves. In studying the Scriptures we become acquainted with God, and are led to understand our relation to Christ, who is the sin-bearer, the surety, the substitute, for our fallen race. These truths concern our present and eternal interests. The Bible stands the highest among books, and its study is valuable above the study of other literature in giving strength and expansion to the mind. Paul says: "Study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth." "But continue thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned them; and that from a child thou hast known the holy Scriptures, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness; that the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works." "For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope."
 
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      We must not permit Satan to cast his hellish shadow athwart our pathway, and accomplish his purpose of eclipsing the bright views of our future reward. Let us not look upon his shadow of darkness. We gain heaven not through our own merits, but through the merits of Jesus Christ. We cannot find salvation in our own individual selves; we are to look unto Jesus, who is the author and finisher of our faith, and as we look, we live. Satan would point us to ourselves, and seek to make us feel that we must bear our own sins. How hard poor mortals strive to be sin-bearers for themselves and for others! but the only sin-bearer is Jesus Christ. He alone can be my substitute and sin-bearer. The forerunner of Christ exclaimed, "Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world." Shall we not give up our sins, and let them go? Shall we not turn from them and hate them, and still remember that Christ regards his human agents as of great value? We cannot calculate the estimate placed upon the soul. Then take your eyes off yourself, and encourage hope and confidence in Christ. Let your hope not be centered in yourself, but in him who has entered within the vail. Talk of the blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ.
 
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      Those who give their hearts to Christ will find rest in his love. We have a token of the magnitude of his love in his sufferings and death. Behold him dying upon the cross amid the deepest gloom; for the heavens are darkened and the earth convulsed. The rent rocks are but a feeble emblem of the state of his mind when he exclaimed, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" But did the Father forsake his Son, whom he called his only begotten and his well-beloved? The reason that Jesus endured such agony was because he became the sinner's substitute and surety. He himself bore the penalty of the law which the sinner deserved, in order that the sinner might have another trial, another chance to prove his loyalty to God and his commandments. There are only two classes in the whole universe,--those who believe in Christ and whose faith leads them to keep God's commandments, and those who do not believe in him, and are disobedient. The sins of the world were laid upon Christ, and for this reason he was numbered with transgressors. He bore the curse and was treated as a transgressor, in order that the repentant sinner might be clothed with his righteousness. He was condemned for sin in which he had no share, in order that we might be justified by righteousness in which we had no part. Christ has manifested his love for us, and has become our representative, in order that our sin need not drown us in perdition.
 
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      Standing as man's representative at Pilate's bar, he suffered the cruel sentence of death to be passed upon him by unreasonable and wicked men, and answered not a word to their accusations. The Majesty of heaven was brought as a lamb to the slaughter; and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he opened not his mouth. When the poor sinner inquired the way of life, Jesus did not remain silent; but when condemned to the most ignominious and cruel of deaths, he had not a word to say. He was not silent because he was guilty; for he was the embodiment of purity and holiness. He could have delivered himself from those who came to take him in the garden of Gethsemane. A few words from his lips sent the murderous throng reeling to the earth, as if smitten by a bolt of the wrath of God. But he suffered humiliation, agony, and death in silence, because he had given his life for the life of the world. He was not compelled to do it, but he volunteered to be man's substitute and surety, and "the Lord laid on him the iniquity of us all." The wages of sin is death, and he freely offered himself as a propitiation for the sins of men. We have every reason to hope in his mercy, to believe in his love. You have every reason to believe that he can and will save you. Why? Because you are guiltless?--No; because you are a sinner, and Jesus says, "I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance." The call is addressed to you, and when Satan says to you that there is no hope, tell him you know there is; "for God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life."
 
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      "Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost, which he shed on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour." Let no one try to carry his own sins, for they have been atoned for by the great sin-bearer. The only begotten Son of God voluntarily met the claims of God's violated law. He was stricken of God and afflicted in our behalf. One with the Father, he was fully able to bear the penalty of our disobedience. By connecting his divinity with our humanity, Christ has exalted the human family. His divinity grasps the throne of the Infinite in behalf of man. As our substitute, he took our sins upon himself, and now he intercedes before the Father in our behalf. "In all things it behooved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of his people. For in that he himself hath suffered being tempted, he is able to succor them that are tempted."
 
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      The sufferings of the Redeemer, in his life and in his death, make it possible for man to return to his loyalty, and become refined and elevated. As his substitute and surety, Christ elevates man, and brings his mind into sympathy with the divine mind. Through faith, that faith that works by love and purifies the soul from all moral defilement, we may overcome every evil trait of character. By accepting the provision made for us, we may represent the character of Christ. Thus we are identified with the Son of God, being one with him as he is one with his Father. So we may overcome the enemy who would lead us away from our loyalty. We may become more than conquerors through him that loved us.
 
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      The Holy Spirit ever abides with him who is seeking for perfection of Christian character. The Holy Spirit furnishes the pure motive, the living, active principle, that sustains striving, wrestling, believing souls in every emergency and under every temptation. The Holy Spirit sustains the believer amid the world's hatred, amid the unfriendliness of relatives, amid disappointment, amid the realization of imperfection, and amid the mistakes of life. Depending upon the matchless purity and perfection of Christ, the victory is sure to him who looks unto the Author and Finisher of our faith. We shall be more that conquerors through him who hath loved us, and given himself for us. He has borne our sins, in order that through him we might have moral excellence, and attain unto the perfection of Christian character. Our Righteousness is our substitute and surety.
 
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      Were the law understood apart from Christ, it would have a crushing power upon sinful men, blotting the sinner out of existence. But by understanding the law in connection with Christ, receiving him by faith as his substitute and surety, man sees himself as a prisoner of hope. The truth as it is in Jesus is an acquaintance with the holy, just, and good law of God, as this law is elevated, and its immutability demonstrated, in Christ. He magnified the law, expanded its every precept, and in his obedience left man an example, that he also may meet its demands.
 
RH.1898-04-05.011
      The human family are in trouble because of their transgression of the Father's law. But God does not leave the sinner until he shows the remedy for sin. The only begotten Son of God has died that we might live. The Lord has accepted this sacrifice in our behalf, as our substitute and surety, on the condition that we receive Christ and believe on him. The sinner must come in faith to Christ, take hold of his merits, lay his sins upon the sin-bearer, and receive his pardon. It was for this cause that Christ came into the world. Thus the righteousness of Christ is imputed to the repenting, believing sinner. He becomes a member of the royal family, a child of the heavenly King, an heir of God, and joint heir with Christ.
 
RH.1898-07-19.002
      This is a consecrated message, commissioning God's servants to preach the gospel to all nations, tongues, and peoples. Christ gave his life to save sinners. He gave himself as a substitute for the sinful race. He made an offering of himself, that men might be elevated and ennobled by entering into oneness with him. He came to quicken their understanding, that they might discern truth. The truths which God had given had been lost or obscured. Through the lapse of time, they had been removed from their true place in the economy of God. Christ replaced and re-established these principles. He laid out a work before his disciples. They were to preach the word. Not in their own strength were they to do this. Christ came to reveal the truth. "The Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, . . . full of grace and truth." In his power the disciples were to carry forward the work given them.
 
RH.1898-11-15.008
      "Then cometh Jesus from Galilee to Jordan unto John, to be baptized of him. But John forbade him, saying, I have need to be baptized of thee, and comest thou to me? And Jesus answering said unto him, Suffer it to be so now: for thus it becometh us to fulfil all righteousness." In "fulfilling" all righteousness, Christ did not bring all righteousness to an end. He fulfilled all the requirements of God in repentance, faith, and baptism, the steps of grace in genuine conversion. He did this as an example, that we should follow in his steps. In his humanity, Christ filled up the measure of the law's requirements. And this he did as an example to us. He was the head of humanity, its substitute and surety. Human beings, by uniting their weakness to the strength of his divine nature, may become partakers of his character.
 
RH.1899-05-23.008
      Christ bore the penalty that would have fallen upon the transgressor; and through faith the helpless, hopeless sinner becomes a partaker of the divine nature, escaping the corruption that is in the world through lust. Christ imputes his perfection and righteousness to the believing sinner when he does not continue in sin, but turns from transgression to obedience of the commandments. Christ rendered perfect obedience to the law, and man could not possibly obey the holy precepts had it not been for the provision that was made for the salvation of the fallen sons and daughters of Adam. Clothed with the habiliments of humanity, Christ passed over the ground where Adam stumbled and fell. He became subject to the same temptations to disregard the word that God had spoken, and to accept the voice of the tempter, who had disguised himself as an angel of light. He met the wily foe's temptations, saying: "It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God." He was assailed by the tempter on every point upon which we are tempted; but as man's substitute and surety, Christ redeemed Adam's disgraceful fall, and kept the way of the Lord.
 
RH.1899-05-30.004
      Christ, as commander of heaven, was appointed to put down the rebellion. Satan and all his sympathizers were cast out of heaven. Then was begun the work which, before the foundations of the world were laid, Christ had engaged to do. At the appointed time he came to our world in human flesh, that he might become man's substitute and surety. Christ came to prove that "God is love." This was disputed by him who was once a covering cherub in heaven, and who, in consequence of his ambitious project, developed a character that made him at war with God. This world became the scene of the great conflict between Christ and Satan.
 
RH.1899-07-25.010
      "For if by one man's offense death reigned by one; much more they which receive abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness shall reign in life by one, Jesus Christ." "For as by one man's disobedience many were made sinners, so by the obedience of one shall many be made righteous." By the grace of Christ we are saved. But grace does not abolish the law of God. The law is the transcript of God's character. It presents his righteousness in contrast with unrighteousness. By the law is the knowledge of sin. The law makes sin appear exceeding sinful. It condemns the transgressor, but it has no power to save and restore him. Its province is not to pardon. Pardon comes through Christ, who lived the law in humanity. Man's only hope is in the substitute provided by God, who gave his Son, that he might reconcile the world to himself. "He hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him."
 
RH.1900-02-06.016
      The great conflict now being waged is not merely a strife of man against man. On one side stands the Prince of Life, acting as man's substitute and surety; on the other, the prince of darkness, with the fallen angels under his command. "We wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places. Wherefore take unto you the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand." "Be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might. Put on the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil."
 
RH.1900-02-13.008
      A fig tree is created to bear fruit; and if it does not do this, it is not fit for a place in the orchard. It is treated as a cumberer of the ground. So the Lord created men and women to bear fruit to his glory and for the good of their fellow creatures, and he has provided them with every facility necessary to enable them to do this. By creation and by redemption we are God's. Christ came as our substitute and surety, that we might bear fruit for him. A probation has been granted us that we might not be like the fig tree, full of flourishing leaves, making great pretensions of success, yet destitute of good works.
 
RH.1900-09-04.008
      Christ was to die as man's substitute. Man was a criminal under the sentence of death for transgression of the law of God, as a traitor, a rebel; hence a substitute for man must die as a malefactor, because he stood in the place of the traitors, with all their treasured sins upon his divine soul. It was not enough that Jesus should die in order to fully meet the demands of the broken law, but he died a shameful death. The prophet gives to the world his words, "I hid not my face from shame and spitting."
 
RH.1900-10-02.011
      In his parables Christ held up the mirror of his Father's mind. Every insult shown by man to his fellow man only made him more conscious of their need of his divine sympathy. He realized the harm Satan was trying to do through the power of position and wealth. In his human nature he felt the need of the ministration of heavenly angels. He felt the need of his Father's help, as no other human being has ever felt it. He was himself winning, as a powerful warrior, a victory in behalf of the world that he had created; and under the most trying circumstances his faith did not fail. He placed himself in his Father's hands, and every insult he endured enabled him better to understand man's great need. As our substitute and surety, he felt every pang of anguish that we can ever feel. He himself suffered, being tempted.
 
RH.1900-10-30.007
      The believer in Christ is consecrated to high and holy purpose. Before the service of the royal priesthood the glory of the Aaronic priesthood is eclipsed. Called according to God's purpose, set apart by grace divine, invested with Christ's righteousness, imbued with the Holy Spirit, offering up the sacrifices of a broken and contrite heart, the true believer is indeed a representative of the Redeemer. Upon such a worshiper, God looks with delight. He will let his light shine into the chambers of the mind and into the soul-temple if men, when they lack wisdom, will go to their closets in prayer, and ask wisdom from him who gives to all men liberally and upbraids not. The promise is, "It shall be given him. But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering. For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed." Christ has pledged himself to be our substitute and surety, and he neglects no one. There is an inexhaustible fund of perfect obedience accruing from his obedience. In heaven his merits, his self-denial and self-sacrifice, are treasured up as incense to be offered up with the prayers of his people. As the sinner's sincere, humble prayers ascend to the throne of God, Christ mingles with them the merits of his life of perfect obedience. Our prayers are made fragrant by this incense. Christ has pledged himself to intercede in our behalf, and the Father always hears his Son. Pray then; pray without ceasing; an answer is sure to come.
 
RH.1901-03-12.004
      As soon as there was sin, there was a Saviour. Christ knew what He would have to suffer, yet He became man's substitute. As soon as Adam sinned, the Son of God presented himself as surety for the human race, with just as much power to avert the doom pronounced upon the guilty as when He died upon the cross of Calvary.
 
RH.1901-05-07.003
      The fiat has gone forth, "The wages of sin is death." The sinner must feel his guiltiness, else he will never repent. He has broken the law, and in so doing has placed himself under its condemnation. The law has no power to pardon the transgressor, but it points him to Christ Jesus, who says to him, I will take your sin and bear it myself, if you will accept me as your substitute and surety. Return to your allegiance, and I will impute to you my righteousness. You will be made complete in me.
 
RH.1901-05-28.014
      Behold the substitute which heaven has provided for you! Herein is love! God has given you amazing proof of His love, a proof which defies all computation. We have no line with which to measure it, no standard with which to compare it. God gave His beloved Son as a propitiation for our sins.
 
RH.1901-09-03.003
      It was the transgression of the law that resulted in sin, sorrow, and death. Satan declared that he would prove to the worlds which God has created, and to the heavenly intelligences, that it was an impossibility to keep the law of God. When Adam yielded to the temptation of the enemy, and fell from his high and holy estate, Satan and his angels exulted. But from the throne of God a voice was heard speaking words of mysterious import. "Sacrifice and offering thou didst not desire; mine ears hast thou opened: burnt offering and sin offering hast thou not required. Then said I, Lo, I come: in the volume of the book it is written of me, I delight to do thy will, O my God: yea, thy law is within my heart." When man fell, Christ announced His purpose of becoming man's substitute and surety. Who was He? Isaiah says of Him, "Unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counselor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace." John says of Him, "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by Him; and without Him was not anything made that was made. In Him was life; and the life was the light of men. . . . And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us (and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father), full of grace and truth."
 
RH.1904-03-24.008
      Why is it that we do not receive more from him who is the source of light and power? We expect too little. Has God lost his love for man? Is not this love still flowing earthward? Has he lost his desire to show himself strong in behalf of his people? Christ will give us victory in the conflict. Who can doubt this when we know that he laid aside his royal robe and kingly crown, and came to this world in the garb of humanity, that he might stand as man's substitute and surety?
 
RH.1906-04-05.013
      God and Christ knew from the beginning, of the apostasy of Satan and of the fall of Adam through the deceptive power of the apostate. The plan of salvation was designed to redeem the fallen race, to give them another trial. Christ was appointed to the office of Mediator from the creation of God, set up from everlasting to be our substitute and surety. Before the world was made, it was arranged that the divinity of Christ should be enshrouded in humanity. "A body," said Christ, "hast thou prepared me." But he did not come in human form until the fulness of time had expired. Then he came to our world, a babe in Bethlehem.
 
RH.1908-05-28.012
      The plan of redemption was arranged in the councils between the Father and the Son. Then Christ pledged himself to render an account for man if he proved disloyal. He pledged himself to make an atonement which would unite every believing soul to God. He who lays his sins upon the substitute and surety, thus becoming a partaker of the divine nature, can unite with the apostle in saying: "Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places." "That in the ages to come he might show the exceeding riches of his grace in his kindness toward us through Christ Jesus." In his infinite love Christ devised the plan of salvation. This plan he stands ready to fulfil in behalf of all who will co-operate with him. In their behalf he says to the Father, Do not impute their sins to them, but lay them on me. Be merciful to their unrighteousness, and their sins and their iniquities remember no more. They have accepted my merits, and made peace with me; and they shall make peace with me. My righteousness is theirs, and for my sake bless them with all spiritual blessings.
 
RH.1912-11-21.003
      Those who do neglect the great gift of salvation, will have no second probation provided for them, but will be left without hope. The Son of the infinite God was the author of our salvation. He covenanted from the first to be man's substitute, and he became man that he might take upon himself the wrath which sin had provoked. The plan of redemption called forth the amazement of the heavenly hosts. The angels looked with wonder to see the mystery wrought out before them in the life of the Son of God. They saw the Redeemer take step after step down the path of humiliation. They saw him rejected, denied, insulted, abused, and crucified, and yet it was something beyond all finite intelligence to comprehend the full mystery of redemption.
 
RH.1912-11-28.003
      The divine Author of salvation left nothing incomplete in the plan; every phase of it is perfect. The sin of the whole world was laid upon Jesus, and divinity gave its highest value to the suffering of humanity in Jesus, that the whole world might be pardoned through faith in the Substitute. The most guilty need have no fear that God will not pardon, for because of the efficacy of the divine sacrifice the penalty of the law will be remitted. Through Christ the sinner may return to allegiance to God. How wonderful is the plan of redemption in its simplicity and fulness! It not only provides for the full pardon of the sinner, but also for the restoration of the transgressor, making a way whereby he may be accepted as a son of God. Through obedience he may be the possessor of love and peace and joy. His faith may unite him in his weakness to Christ, the source of divine strength; and through the merits of Christ he may find the approval of God, because Christ has satisfied the demands of the law, and he imputes his righteousness to the penitent, believing soul. The spotless robe woven in the loom of heaven covers the contrite one, and he wills to be obedient, taking the yoke of Christ, suffering as Christ suffered when he walked a man among men.
 
ST.1878-03-07.015 Signs of the Times 1878
      David exclaims, "The law of the Lord is perfect converting the soul." David had transgressed the law, and the law held him a prisoner until he repented of his sin, and was pardoned through faith in the virtue of the promised Redeemer. There is no power in the law to remove a single defect, nor to save the sinner from the consequence of his transgression. But when the sinner is convicted by the light of the law, then he has a work to do: Repentance toward God because of transgression of his law, and faith toward our Lord Jesus Christ, the sinners substitute and surety. Then pardon and free salvation may be his. But Jesus Christ will never save any one who has a knowledge of the law of God, yet lives in transgression of it.
 
 
ST.1878-03-14.004
      The sins of the people were transferred in figure to the officiating priest, who was a mediator for the people. The priest could not himself become an offering for sin, and make an atonement with his life, for he was also a sinner. Therefore, instead of suffering death himself, he killed a lamb without blemish; the penalty of sin was transferred to the innocent beast, which thus became his immediate substitute, and typified the perfect offering of Jesus Christ. Through the blood of this victim, man looked forward by faith to the blood of Christ which would atone for the sins of the world.
 
ST.1878-03-21.017
      If Christians were to be tested now as were the Jews at the first advent of Christ, few would accept him wrapped in his garment of humanity, living a life of humiliation and poverty. The Christian world can accept Messiah as a King at the right hand of God in heaven, but their hearts reject a Saviour of humility and self-sacrifice; they shrink from the cross of Christ, even as did the haughty Pharisees. Few indeed imitate the example of Jesus, and follow his teachings in their daily lives. He has exhorted his disciples to follow in his foot-steps. Many are in as great blindness concerning the plan of salvation as were the Pharisees, who professed obedience to God while they rejected Him who came to work out their salvation, that their efforts to gain a righteous character should have virtue with God through the sinner's Advocate and substitute.
 
ST.1879-08-07.006
      The Son of God, in becoming man's substitute, and bearing the curse which should fall upon man, has pledged himself in behalf of the race to maintain the sacred claims and exalted honor of his Father's law. His work and mission was to convince men of sin, which is the transgression of that law, and through the divine mediation, bring them back to obedience to his perfect law. The Father has given the world into the hands of Christ, that through his mediatorial work he may completely vindicate the binding claims and the holiness of every principle of his law.
 
ST.1880-02-26.003
      Finite man may learn a lesson that should never be forgotten,--to approach God with reverence. We may come boldly into his presence, presenting the name of Jesus, our righteousness and substitute, but never with the boldness of presumption, as though he were on a level with ourselves. We have heard some address the great and all-powerful and holy God, who dwelleth in light unapproachable, as they would not address an equal, or even an inferior. We have seen some behave themselves in the presence of God as they would not dare to do in the presence of an earthly friend. These show that they have not a proper view of God's character and the greatness of his power. They should remember that God's eye is upon them; he reads the thoughts of their hearts concerning him. He will not be mocked. God is greatly to be reverenced; wherever his presence is clearly realized, sinful man will bow in the most humble attitude, and from the depths of the soul cry out, "How dreadful is this place!"
 
ST.1884-09-18.008
      In the word of God the mind finds subject for the deepest thought, the loftiest aspiration. Here we may hold communion with patriarchs and prophets, and listen to the voice of the Eternal as he speaks with men. Here we behold the Majesty of Heaven as he humbled himself to become our substitute and surety, to cope single-handed with the powers of darkness, and to gain the victory in our behalf. A reverent contemplation of the themes brought to view in the word of God, cannot fail to soften, purify, and ennoble the heart, and, at the same time, to inspire the mind with new strength and energy.
 
ST.1886-06-03.006
      God's work is the same in all time, although there are different degrees of development, and different manifestations of his power to meet the wants of man in the different ages. Commencing with the fall, down through the patriarchal and Jewish ages, even to the present time, there has been a gradual unfolding of the purposes of God in the plan of redemption. Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Moses understood the gospel through Christ; they looked for the salvation of the race through man's substitute and surety. These holy men of old held communion with the Saviour who was to come to our world in human flesh; and some of them talked with Christ and heavenly angels face to face, as a man talks with his friend.
 
ST.1886-07-29.002
      "Sin is the transgression of the law," and "the wages of sin is death." It was sin that brought death into the world. Had there been no sin, there would have been no death. Christ died as the sinner's substitute, to save him from the penalty of his disobedience. Could the law of God have been changed or abolished, Christ need not have died; for death was not necessary in order to abolish the law. The fact that God spared not his own sinless, beloved Son from the penalty he pledged himself to bear as the sinner's substitute, is the most telling argument that could be produced to show that the claims of his law will not be released, even in the slightest degree, to save the transgressor. So in the death of Christ we have evidence, not only of God's love for sinful man, but of the changeless character of his law. The law could not be abolished; one precept could not be altered to save the sinner and meet man in his fallen condition; but God so loved the world that he gave his Son to suffer the penalty of its transgression in the sinner's stead.
 
ST.1886-08-12.005
      If morality and religion are to live in a school, it must be through a knowledge of God's word. As an educating power, the Bible is without a rival. This sacred word is the will of God revealed to men, and its study will ennoble every thought, feeling, and aspiration. Here we learn what God requires of the creatures formed in his image. Here we learn how to improve the present life so as to secure the future, immortal life. Here we may hold communion with patriarchs and prophets, and listen to the voice of the Eternal as he speaks with men. Here we may behold the Majesty of the Heavens, as he humbles himself to become our substitute and surety, to cope single-handed with the powers of darkness, and to gain the victory in our behalf. A reverent contemplation of such themes as these, cannot fail to soften, purify, and ennoble the heart,and, at the same time, to inspire the mind with new strength and vigor. No other book can satisfy the questionings of the mind and the cravings of the heart.
 
ST.1888-03-30.006
      The law of God condemns all selfishness, all pride of heart, every species of dishonesty, every secret or open transgression. The natural heart is not inclined to love its precepts, or obey its requirements. "It is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be." But genuine faith in Christ converts the heart, works a change in its attitude to the law, until it delights in the law of God. The man who manifests enmity to the law has not submitted to the converting power of God. It is the keeping of the commandments that proves the sincerity of our professions of love. Says John, "This is the love of God, that we keep his commandments; and his commandments are not grievous." Satan is engaged in leading men to pervert the plain meaning of God's word. He desires that the world should have no clear idea in regard to the plan of salvation. He well knows that the object of Christ's life of obedience, the object of his suffering, trial, and death upon the cross, was to magnify the divine law, to become a substitute for guilty man, that he might have remission for sins that are past, and grace for future obedience; that the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in him -- and he be transformed and fitted for the heavenly courts. Satan knows that no transgressor of the divine law will ever enter the kingdom of Heaven, and to rob God of the devotion and service of man, to thwart the plan of salvation, and work the ruin of those for whom Christ died, is the motive that actuates his warfare against the law of Heaven. He caused the fall of the holy pair in Eden by leading them to lightly esteem the commandment of God, to think his requirements unjust, and unreasonable, that they were not binding, and that their transgression would not be visited, as God had said, with death.
 
ST.1888-07-06.012
      As these truths flash upon the mind of the sinner, a moral revolution takes place. He realizes that the testimony of the word and the Spirit agree; and doubt is swept away. He can rejoice in Christ as his living Saviour, his substitute, his surety, his strength and righteousness. The day-star has arisen in his heart. Christ is formed within, the hope of  glory; and with John, the language of the soul is, "Behold, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God." He has a foundation for his faith. It is Christ, the Rock of Ages. He dares to love him, for the light reflected from the cross of Calvary reveals his Saviour to his soul, as "the chiefest among ten thousand," and the one "altogether lovely."
 
ST.1889-05-20.007
      We should know how to direct the mind of friends and neighbors to Christ when they are in trouble. We should know how to lead repentant souls to "the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world." How many go to human friends to pour out their griefs and sorrows, instead of seeking Christ, who alone can heal the broken in heart. There are many who do not know how to come to Jesus with their burden, and, feeling their need of support, they turn to human hearts for comfort. But they are only leaning on broken props. God is the one to whom the troubled soul should go. Why put man in his place? We should seek to direct souls to the open door of Heaven, where we can see within the vail our Substitute and Surety. In every trial and perplexity, we should look to him; for in him is help for the fallen sons of men. Christ is the star of hope that illumines our darkness. The serpent may bruise the heel of the seed of the woman, but Christ will bruise the serpent's head and take away his power at last.
 
ST.1889-11-25.006
      Christ was the Son of God, equal with the Father; and yet he was abused, ridiculed, scourged, and crucified. There are many who have thought that the Father had no part in the sufferings of the Son; but this is a mistake. The Father suffered with the Son. When the Son of God hung upon Calvary, the darkness gathered like the pall of death about the cross. All nature sympathized with its dying Author. There were thunderings and lightnings, and a mighty earthquake, but the hearts of men were so hardened that they could quarrel at the foot of the cross upon which hung the world's Redeemer, about the dividing of his vesture. Their hearts seemed to be wholly under the control of the powers of darkness. Angels looked upon the scene with sorrow and amazement. As man's substitute and surety, the iniquity of men was laid upon Christ; he was counted a transgressor that he might redeem them from the curse of the law. The guilt of every descendant of Adam was pressing upon his heart; and the wrath of God, and the terrible manifestation of his displeasure because of iniquity, filled the soul of his Son with consternation. The withdrawal of the divine countenance from the Saviour, in this hour of supreme anguish, pierced his heart with a sorrow that can never be fully understood by man. Sin, so hateful to his sight, was heaped upon him till he groaned beneath its weight. The despairing agony of the Son of God was so much greater than his physical pain, that the latter was hardly felt by him. The hosts of Heaven veiled their faces from the fearful sight. They heard his despairing cry, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" they saw the divine Sufferer die beneath the sins of the world.
 
ST.1889-12-30.002
      The law of God is a transcript of his character; it portrays the nature of God. As in Christ we behold the brightness of his glory, the express image of his person, so also in the law the attributes of the Father are unfolded. Although the law is unchangeable, his having provided a means of salvation for the law-breaker does not in the least detract from the dignity of the character of God, since the penalty of man's transgression was borne by a divine Substitute. The Father himself suffered with the Son; for "God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself." Man, with his human, finite judgment, cannot safely question the wisdom of God. Hence it is unbecoming for him to criticise the plan of salvation. Before the theme of redemption, let man lay his wisdom in the dust, and accept the plans of Him whose wisdom is infinite.
 
ST.1890-06-09.011
      Jesus has given this invitation, "Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest." In coming to Jesus, we reveal our faith. The law condemns the sinner, and by this condemnation he is led to see the necessity of a Saviour. He seeks refuge in Jesus, and the Son is glorified and exalted as the Redeemer of the world; he is the sinner's substitute and surety.
 
ST.1890-07-14.003
      The sinner will find no saving quality in law; he must look to the surety and substitute, for it is the blood of Christ that cleanseth from all sin. The repenting prodigal is taken into fellowship with God, and he becomes one with Christ, as Christ is one with the Father. The obedient children of God recognize the law as a divine law, the sacrifice on Calvary as a divine sacrifice, and the Holy Spirit as their divine sanctifier. All the claims of the law are met in Jesus. In him we have a perfect foundation for our faith. The Son of God did not die that man might always remain a transgressor; for Christ is not a minister of sin. He died that by that act man might no longer remain a rebel against God's law. He died to point men to the way of faith and obedience, that they might see to the end of that which is abolished. When sinners have a view of the plan of salvation, there is no more disposition to cavil concerning the law; for the way of truth and light is open to their understanding. They see that "whosoever committeth sin transgresseth also the law; for sin is the transgression of the law." In the light of the law the sinner is convicted as was Paul.
 
ST.1890-07-14.004
      Christ revealed himself to Paul in a flood of glory, and he was struck down helpless before him. He asked, "Who art thou, Lord?" and the Lord answered, "I am Jesus, whom thou persecutest." Paul then inquired, "What will thou have me to do?" When Christ is revealed to the soul, the sinner's relation to the law is made plain. There must be repentance toward God for the transgression of his law, and faith toward our Lord Jesus Christ as the sinner's substitute. The convicted sinner sees his bruised, demoralized condition, feels his need of a physician, sees Christ as his only hope, and lays hold of him by faith. He is deeply conscious of his sin and ruin, and seeks the divine remedy in the world's Redeemer.
 
ST.1890-07-28.003
      Our first parents transgressed the law of God in the garden of Eden, and fell from their high estate, and death was pronounced upon Adam and his posterity; but the human race was not left to hopeless misery. The Son of God consented to become man's substitute and surety; he consented to take the wrath of the Father upon himself. Through the infinite sacrifice of Christ in man's behalf, the star of hope illuminated the dark future of Adam, and another probation was granted him in which to prepare for eternal life. Jesus came to our world to be a man of sorrows, to become acquainted with grief. He did not take his position with the lofty and rich of this world, although he owned the world. Had he done this, there might have been some excuse for the haughty bearing of the rich, as though they thought salvation was only for them. Jesus said that he came to preach the gospel to the poor. With his human arm he reached to the very depths of human woe, in order that he might lift up fallen man, and elevate and ennoble the race, and finally exalt the overcomers to his throne.
 
ST.1890-07-28.004
      Jesus might have remained in heaven, to receive the adoration of the heavenly host, but he did not do this. For man's sake he stepped down from the throne, laid aside his royal robe, clothed his divinity with humanity, and for our sake became poor, that we through his poverty might be made rich. In assuming humanity, he exalted the fallen race before God, and made it possible for sinful man to become an heir of heaven. Can we wonder that John exclaimed, "Behold, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God"? Men think that it is a great honor to be connected with an earthly king, but John tells us that by a life of obedience we may become the children of the heavenly King, and have connection with the Majesty on high. When Christ became man's substitute and surety, it was that he might unite finite man with the infinite God, and connect earth with heaven. The Son of God took upon him the nature of man, bore insult, ignominy, shame, and death, in order to save a wicked world. He was tempted in all points like as we are, that he might become acquainted with our temptations; by this experience of suffering and trial, he opened the way that the sons and daughters of Adam may return to allegiance to God, and make their way back to the tree of life, which is in the midst of the Paradise of God. That Jesus has been tempted in all points like as we are, that he is able to succor those who are tempted, has given men confidence to come to him and pour out all their sorrows before him; for he has borne our griefs, and is touched with the feeling of our infirmities. After he has made an infinite sacrifice for us, will any of us be so ungrateful as to refuse to accept it? He was our example in all things, and we are to study the life and character of our Lord, and learn of him meekness and lowliness of heart.
 
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      Christ was one with the Father from the beginning; he shared the glory of the Father; and yet he consented to become fallen man's substitute and surety, to stand in man's place, that he might bring hope and salvation to every soul who would receive him as a sin-pardoning Saviour. With his human arm he encircles the lost race, and with his divine arm he grasps the throne of the Infinite, connecting man with God, and earth with heaven. It was impossible for man, who had weakened his moral power through transgression of God's law, to keep the commandments of God; but Christ came to save his people from their sins, and by faith the soul is clothed with the righteousness of Christ, and brought into the favor of God. Christ stepped down from his exalted throne, left the royal courts, clothed his divinity with humanity, and became a man among the children of men; he humbled himself even to the suffering and death of the cross, that man might be exalted, that man might become a partaker of the divine nature, be an overcomer, and have a place with Christ upon his throne in glory.
 
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      The reason why more are not turned from sin to obedience and holiness, from the service and power of Satan to the service of God, is that the teachers do not work in the same lines with Christ. They do not dwell sufficiently upon Christ's self-denial in lifting the cross and bearing it in behalf of man. As did the Master so must his servants do. His self-sacrifice in becoming the substitute and surety for man led him in the path of humiliation; and this was the appointed way for humanity. He was our example in all things. In Christ are the cross and crown united; and all who are partakers with him in his sufferings and humiliation here will, if they hold fast their confidence to the end, be partakers with him in his glory hereafter.
 
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      Jesus saw that man was plunged in sin and misery, and had not moral power to overcome in his own strength, so Jesus gave himself, that he might unite man with himself, and make provision that sinners might lay hold of his strength and make peace with God. When Adam and Eve transgressed, Jesus said: "I will take upon me the sin of the fallen race. I will bear the penalty of sin, that I may impart to men my strength and righteousness." When Jesus came to the world it was as our substitute and surety. He passed through all the experiences of man, from the manger to Calvary, at every step giving man an example of what he should be and what he should do. Behold him on the banks of the Jordan, asking for baptism at the hands of John. "But John forbade him, saying, I have need to be baptized of thee, and comest thou to me? And Jesus answering said unto him, Suffer it to be so now; for thus it becometh us to fulfill all righteousness. Then he suffered him. And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up straightway out of the water; and, lo, the heavens were opened unto him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and lighting upon him; and lo a voice from heaven, saying, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased."
 
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      How Satan and his angels triumphed as they discovered that the Son of God had taken upon him the nature of man, and had come to be man's substitute, to engage in the conflict in his behalf.
 
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      "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." This message is for the world, for "whosoever" means that any and all who comply with the condition may share the blessing. All who look unto Jesus, believing in him as their personal Saviour, shall "not perish, but have everlasting life." Every provision has been made that we may have the everlasting reward. Christ is our sacrifice, our substitute, our surety, our divine intercessor; he is made unto us righteousness, sanctification, and redemption. "For Christ is not entered into the holy places made with hands, which are the figures of the true, but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us."
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      The intercession of Christ in our behalf is that of presenting his divine merits in the offering of himself to the Father as our substitute and surety; for he ascended up on high to make an atonement for our transgressions. "If any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous; and he is the propitiation for our sins; and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world." "Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins." "He is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them."
 
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      We have a living Saviour. He is not in Joseph's new tomb; he is risen from the dead, and has ascended on high as a substitute and surety for every believing soul. "Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ." The sinner is justified through the merits of Jesus, and this is God's acknowledgment of the perfection of the ransom paid for man. That Christ was obedient even unto the death of the cross is a pledge of the repenting sinner's acceptance with the Father. Then shall we permit ourselves to have a vacillating experience of doubting and believing, believing and doubting? Jesus is the pledge of our acceptance with God. We stand in favor before God, not because of any merit in ourselves, but because of our faith in "the Lord our righteousness."
 
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                            Importunate Prayer.      In coming to God the prayer of importunity should be offered, "I will not let thee go except thou bless me." You are invited to spread out all your perplexities before the Lord; but do not gratify the enemy by pouring them into the minds of others, lest they stumble over them to their ruin. Jesus knows how to cure all the maladies of the soul. When we beseech the Lord to pity us in our weakness and distress, to guide us by his Holy Spirit, that we may understand his word, he will no more turn away from the prayer of the humble suppliant than the parent will turn away from the hungry child who comes to him for bread. When you turn away from the broken cistern that can hold no water, and in the name of Jesus, your Advocate, come directly to God, asking for the things you need, difficulties will disappear, the righteousness of Christ will be revealed as your righteousness, the virtue of Christ as your virtue. You will then understand that justification can come alone through faith in Christ; for in Jesus is revealed the perfection of the character of God; in his life is the revelation of the genuine principle of true holiness. Through the atoning blood of Christ, the sinner is set free from bondage and condemnation; through the perfection of the sinless Substitute and Surety, he may run in the race of humble obedience to all of God's commandments. Without Christ he is under the condemnation of the law, always a sinner, but through faith in Christ he is made just before God, and loving God, he keeps his commandments, and realizes through an experimental knowledge that the Father loves him, and takes up his abode with him.                                     -
 
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      The provision made for the salvation of men through the imputed righteousness of Christ, does not do away with the law, or lessen in the least its holy claims; for Christ came to exalt the law and make it honorable, to reveal its exceeding breadth and changeless character. The glory of the gospel of grace through the imputed righteousness of Christ, provides no other way of salvation than through obedience to the law of God in the person of Jesus Christ, the divine substitute. In the old dispensation believers were saved through the grace of Christ, as presented in the gospel, as we are saved today. The only means of salvation is provided under the Abrahamic covenant.
 
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      Christ knows the sinner's trials; he knows his temptations. He has taken upon himself our nature; he was tempted in all points like as we are, and he knows how to succor those who are tempted. He has wept, and he knows our sorrows, he has experienced all our griefs. To all who believe and trust in him, he will be a hiding-place from the wind, and a covert from the tempest. As a man, Christ ascended to heaven. As a man, he is the substitute for humanity. As a man, he liveth to make intercession for us. He is preparing a place for all who love him. As a man, he will come again with kingly power and glory to receive his children. And that which should cause us joy and thanksgiving is that God "hath appointed a day, in the which he will judge the world in righteousness by that man whom he hath ordained."
 
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      In order to save fallen man, under a sense of the infinite magnitude of the task, Christ undertook to represent to the world the character of God in his great love for the world. Nothing was allowed to divert his attention for a moment. His one effort was to carry out the plan of God laid before the foundation of the world. Said Christ, "Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again." As the Father knoweth me, even so know I the Father; and I lay down my life for the sheep." That is: "My Father hath so loved you, that he even loves me more for giving my life to redeem you. In becoming your substitute and surety, by surrendering my life, by taking your liabilities, your transgressions, I am endeared to my Father; for by my sacrifice, his will is fulfilled, his law vindicated, and God can be just, and yet justify him who believes in Jesus."
 
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      In the council of heaven, provision was made that men, through transgressors, should not perish in their disobedience, but, through faith in Christ as their substitute and surety, might become the elect of God predestinated unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to himself according to the good pleasure of his will. God wills that all men should be saved; for ample provision has been made, in giving his only-begotten Son to pay man's ransom. Those who perish will perish because they refuse to be adopted as children of God through Christ Jesus. The pride of man hinders him from accepting the provisions of salvation. But human merit will not admit a soul into the presence of God. That which will make a man acceptable to God is the imparted grace of Christ through faith in his name. No dependence can be placed in works or in happy flights of feelings as evidence that men are chosen of God; for the elect are chosen through Christ.
 
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      We are to realize to what we are called in Christ; for by faith we are to attain unto his righteousness. Since this is the standard for our attainment, how can any of us be satisfied with our present attainments? If we have been dwelling upon things seen and temporal, let us turn our attention to the things unseen and eternal. Let us not wait for a revival in the church, or for special conviction; but, realizing our need, and knowing that all heaven is at our command, let us now yield our hearts to God. Let us not think that we may wait until some Conference meeting, until a large company is called forward, to seek God's blessing. It is best for us to be awake individually, to-day yielding our hearts to God. Decide now to dedicate yourself to him, not only as a congregation, but as individuals; decide to seek those things which are above, where Christ sitteth on the right hand of God. Do not wait one for another. Do not look about you to see if your neighbor is going to make the surrender, but, realizing that each one of us must give an account of himself to God, that we have a living Saviour, who is our substitute and surety, draw nigh to God
 
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      In the work of creation, Christ was with God. He was one with God, equal with him, the brightness of his glory, the express image of his person, the representative of the Father. He alone, the Creator of man, could be his Saviour. No angel of heaven could reveal the Father to the sinner, and win him back to allegiance to God. But Christ could manifest the Father's love; for God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself. Christ could be the "day's man" between a holy God and lost humanity, one who could "lay his hand upon us both." None but Christ could redeem man from the curse of the law. He proposed to take upon himself the guilt and shame of sin,--sin so offensive in the sight of God that it would necessitate separation from his Father. Christ proposed to reach to the depths of man's degradation and woe, and restore the repenting, believing soul to harmony with God. Christ, the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world, offered himself as a sacrifice and substitute for the fallen sons of Adam though in this offering all heaven was involved in infinite sacrifice. But the Father so loved the world that he gave his only-begotten Son, that through his smitten heart a channel might be found for the outflowing of infinite love for fallen man. Man had become so degraded by sin, his nature so perverted by evil, that it was impossible for him of himself to come into harmony with God, whose nature is purity and love. But Christ redeemed him from the condemnation of the law, and imparted divine power, and through man's cooperation, the sinner could be restored to his lost estate.
 
 
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      In becoming man's substitute, in bearing the curse which should fall upon man, Christ has pledged himself in behalf of the race to maintain the sacred and exalted honor of his Father's law. He came to convince men of sin, which is the transgression of the law, and through divine mediation bring them back to obedience to God's commandments. God has given the world into the hands of Christ, that he may completely vindicate the binding claims of the law, and make manifest the holiness of every principle. Christ was the Father's "appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds." He was the "brightness of his glory, the express image of his person." And he upheld "all things by the word of his power." He possessed divine excellency and greatness. It pleased the Father that in him all fullness should dwell. And Christ "thought it not robbery to be equal with God." Yet Jesus exchanged a throne of light and glory which he had with his Father, counting it not a thing to be desired to be equal with God, while man was lost in sin and misery. He came from heaven to earth, clothed his divinity with humanity, and bore the curse as surety for the fallen race. He was not compelled to do this; but he chose to bear the results of man's transgression that man might escape eternal death.
 
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      Satan and his angels exulted as they discovered that the Son of God had taken upon himself the nature of man, and had come to be man's substitute, to engage in the conflict in our behalf. The human family had been overpowered by the deception of the enemy; for all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God, and the enemy hoped that Christ also would become a victim to his seductive wiles. Satan gloried in the opportunity of besieging the Son of God with fierce temptations. Because he had taken upon himself the nature of man, Satan deemed that his victory was certain, and with every malignant device in his power he strove to overcome Christ. The steadfast resistance of Christ to the temptations of the enemy brought the whole confederacy of evil to war against him. Evil men and evil angels united their forces against the Prince of Peace. The issues at stake were beyond the comprehension of men, and the temptations that assailed Christ were as much more intense and subtle than those which assail man as his character was purer and more exalted than is the character of man in his moral and physical defilement. In his conflict with the prince of darkness in this atom of a world, Christ had to meet the whole confederacy of evil, the united forces of the adversary of God and man; but at every point he met the tempter, and put him to flight. Christ was conqueror over the powers of darkness, and took the infinite risk of consenting to war with the enemy, that he might conquer him in our behalf.
 
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      Through the death of Christ a door of hope was opened for fallen man. Man was under sentence of death for the transgression of the law of God. He was under condemnation as a traitor, as a rebel; but Christ came to be his substitute, to die as a malefactor, to suffer the penalty of the traitors, bearing the weight of their sins upon his divine soul. He descended lower and lower till there was no lower depths of humiliation to sound in order that he might lift up those who would believe in him, and cleanse the guilty from moral defilement, and impart to them his own righteousness. He died to make an atonement, to redeem, cleanse, restore, and exalt man to a place at his right hand.
 
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      We need not place the obedience of Christ by itself as something for which he was particularly adapted, because of his divine nature; for he stood before God as man's representative, and was tempted as man's substitute and surety. If Christ had a special power which it is not the privilege of a man to have, Satan would have made capital of this matter. But the work of Christ was to take from Satan his control of man, and he could do this only in a straightforward way. He came as a man, to be tempted as a man, rendering the obedience of a man. Christ rendered obedience to God, and overcame as humanity overcome. We are led to make wrong conclusions because of erroneous views of the nature of our Lord. To attribute to his nature a power that it is not possible for man to have in his conflicts with Satan, is to destroy the completeness of his humanity. The obedience of Christ to his Father was the same obedience that is required of man. Man cannot overcome Satan's temptations except as divine power works through humanity. The Lord Jesus came to our world, not to reveal what God in his own divine person could do, but what he could do through humanity. Through faith man is to be a partaker of the divine nature, and to overcome every temptation wherewith he is beset. It was the Majesty of heaven who became a man, who humbled himself to our human nature; it was he who was tempted in the wilderness and who endured the contradiction of sinners against himself.
 
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      We are required to keep the commandments of God, and to demonstrate before the heavenly worlds that we are obedient children, loyal and true to the government of God. We may not expect the world, which is under the power and dominion of Satan, to obey God and keep his commandments. There are but two classes in our world, the obedient and the disobedient, the holy and the unholy. When our transgressions were laid upon Jesus, he was numbered among the unholy on the sinner's account. He became our substitute, our surety, before the Father and all the heavenly angels. By imputing the sins of the world to Jesus, he became the sinner in our stead, and the curse due to our sins came upon him. It becomes us to contemplate Christ's life of humiliation and his agonizing death; for he was treated as the sinner deserves to be treated. He came to our world, clothing his divinity with humanity, to bear the test and proving of God. By his example of perfect obedience in his human nature, he teaches us that men may be obedient.
 
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      Jesus said, "Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life." He gave his life for the sheep. The only-begotten Son of God accepts all the liabilities that fall upon the transgressor of the law, vindicates its unchangeable and holy character. The death of Christ removes every argument that Satan could bring against the precepts of Jehovah. Satan has declared that men could not enter the kingdom of heaven unless the law was abolished and a way devised by which transgressors could be reinstated into the favor of God, and made heirs of heaven. He made the claim that the law must be changed, that the reins of government must be slackened in heaven, that sin must be tolerated, and sinners pitied and saved in their sins. But every such plea was cast aside when Christ died as a substitute for the sinner. He who was made equal with God bore the sin of the transgressor, and thereby made a channel whereby the love of God could be communicated to a fallen world, and his grace and power imparted to those who came to Christ in penitence for their sin.
 
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      When sin first entered the world, God had promised a deliverer. He had said to the serpent, "I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel." When Jesus came to the world, his own nation despised him, his friends denied him, his brethren did not believe on him. The unbelief with which he was met was indeed a bruising of his heel. Christ, the world's Redeemer, was buffeted with temptation, but it had been written of him, "He shall not fail, nor be discouraged, till he have set judgment in the earth." Through the very bruising of his heel by Satan, because of affliction, temptation, and sorrow, Christ was gaining the victory in behalf of the human family; for he triumphed over his enemy in not yielding to his temptation, and thus bruised the head of the serpent. He endured the contradiction of sinners against himself, and every pang of anguish he suffered, every temptation he resisted, as man's substitute and surety, was elevating the human family in the scale of moral worth, and was procuring for man deliverance from Satan's power and bondage. The character of Satan, through his efforts to overcome and destroy the Son of God, was developing before the universe, and was being made manifest in its true malignity before the unfallen worlds that had been created by Christ. Every time he stung the heel of Christ with his murderous fang, the serpent was making more sure his own discomfiture and ruin.
 
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      He had said, "Destroy this temple [speaking of the temple of his body], and in three days I will raise it up." On the cross he received the wounds that will mark his form through the ceaseless ages of eternity; but those very wounds will be his glory, the insignia of his triumph over him who bruised his heel; for he shall bruise the serpent's head. On the cross he cried, "It is finished," and bowed his head and died. He descended into the grave; but after three days a mighty angel, clothed with the panoply of heaven, parted the darkness from his track, and caused the Roman guard to fall as dead men at his feet. The angel rolled back the stone from the sepulcher, and the Roman seal was broken, and Christ came forth from the prison of death, and, over the rent sepulcher of Joseph, proclaimed himself "the resurrection and the life." Through him it was announced that every son and daughter of Adam might be emancipated from their bondage to Satan, to sin and transgression; for, as man's substitute and surety, Jesus had won the victory. The world and its inhabitants were his inheritance, purchased at infinite cost, and every soul who believed in his name, might be an heir of God and a joint heir with Jesus Christ. When Christ rose from the dead, the victory was proclaimed in triumph by the loftiest order of heavenly intelligence, and joy, inexpressible joy, filled the courts of God.
 
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      All legalism, all the sorrow and woe by which you may encompass yourself, will not give you one moment of relief. You cannot rightly estimate sin. You must accept God's estimate, and it is heavy indeed. If you bore the guilt of your sin, it would crush you; but the sinless One has taken your place, and, though, undeserving, he has borne your guilt. By accepting the provision God has made, you may stand free before God in the merit and virtue of your Substitute. You will then have a proper estimate of sin, and the godly sorrow of true repentance will take the place of hopeless discouragement and grief, for you will turn from sin with grief and abhorrence.
 
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      Man lost his righteousness through transgression, and "God so loved the world, that he gave his only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." Through the righteousness of Christ, our substitute and surety, our obedience to God's commandments is made acceptable. Christ clothed his divinity with humanity, and endured the test upon the point of appetite, ambition, and love of the world, thus making it possible for man to keep the commandments of God through his imputed righteousness. Through faith in Christ, man becomes partaker of the divine nature, and is complete in him, as long as he walks in the light. But when light has come to a soul that has been in darkness in regard to the binding claims of the law of God, and the transgressor refuses to walk in the light, he is guilty before God, and is charged with apostasy. He chooses that sin shall have dominion over him, and therefore the penalty of the law is upon him. By his continued transgression he reveals the fact that he is at enmity with God, that his heart is carnal, and not subject to the law of God. He repeats the transgression of Adam, accepts the insinuations of the fallen foe, takes his place on the side of the man of sin, and exalts Satan above God. In refusing the light, he becomes one with the ranks of apostasy, and chooses to act with the confederacy of Satan.
 
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      We are not under a system of mere requirements, mere justice, and unsympathizing rigor. The penalty of transgressing the law has fallen upon our Substitute and Surety, and for a time has been suspended, so that the guilty do not feel its weight; but the object of this suspension is not to teach us that its claims are over, its exactions set aside, but to attract us to holiness, to obedience. Nothing is changed except the manner of bringing men to obey the law. Obey its claims we must. The first step toward obedience is repentance. We are to see the excellence of its requirements by beholding the wrong of disobedience.
 
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      The controversy was to wage between Christ and Satan throughout all time. The costly ransom that was provided reveals the value that God set upon man. Christ volunteered to become man's surety and substitute, and took upon himself the penalty of transgression, in order that a way might be provided whereby every son and daughter of Adam may, through faith in their Redeemer, cooperate with heavenly intelligences, and oppose the workings of Satan, and thus bring in everlasting righteousness. The Lord Jesus would take man into partnership with himself. Human intelligences have been endowed by their Creator with capabilities and powers, which, if surrendered to God, will promote his glory in building up his kingdom in the earth. Human beings can reach human beings through the imparted gift of the Spirit of God. Through faith man accepts the world's Redeemer as  his Captain, and when standing under his blood-stained banner, he becomes a partaker of the divine nature, and in cooperation with God is to act an important part in revealing the glory of God to a world in the darkness of transgression. Unless man shall fully cooperate with Christ in the work of rescuing souls from evil, the plan of salvation can never be carried out. But through the scheme of redemption, notwithstanding the opposition of Satan's united agencies, the Lord will bring good out of the evil that Satan designed should exist. The counsels of God will stand before unfallen worlds, before heavenly intelligences, before the fallen world, and he will accomplish all the good pleasure of his will.
 
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      "That their hearts might be comforted, being knit together in love, and unto all riches of the full assurance of understanding, to the acknowledging of the mystery of God, and of the Father, and of Christ; in whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge." If we will follow on to know the Lord, our views will broaden. They will not be bound about by self. We should pray the Lord to enlarge our understanding, so that we may not only understand that Jesus Christ is our substitute and surety, but that we belong to Christ as his purchased possession. Paul says, "Ye are bought with a price," and draws this conclusion, "Therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God's."
 
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      "My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous." There is no quality in law to save the transgressor of the law. The law can condemn, but it cannot pardon, therefore the transgressor would have been left to perish in his wretchedness if a plan had not been devised for his salvation. Jesus Christ alone was able to save fallen man. He became man's surety and substitute. He became man's advocate to plead his case before the Father. It was for our sake that he condescended to become man. "The Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father), full of grace and truth." Christ became the comfort and hope of the fallen race. Our Saviour is the Son of man as well as the Son of God. He took humanity upon him, and presented a model for humanity in his pure and perfect character. "He did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth." His life was as complete as a pattern, as his death was complete as a sacrifice. He was tempted in all points like as we are, therefore he knows how to succor those that are tempted.
 
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      The atonement of Christ was not made in order to induce God to love those whom he otherwise hated; it was not made to produce a love that was not in existence; but it was made as a manifestation of the love that was already in God's heart, an exponent of the divine favor in the sight of heavenly intelligences, in the sight of worlds unfallen, and in the sight of a fallen race. "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." We are not to entertain the idea that God loves us because Christ has died for us, but that he so loved us that he gave his only-begotten Son to die for us. The death of Christ was expedient in order that mercy might reach us with its full pardoning power, and at the same time that justice might be satisfied in the righteous substitute. The glory of God was revealed in the rich mercy that he poured out upon a race of rebels, who through repentance and faith might be pardoned through the merits of Christ, for God will by no means clear the guilty who refuse to acknowledge the merit of a crucified and risen Saviour. It is only through faith in Christ that sinners may have the righteousness of Christ imputed unto them, and that they may be "made the righteousness of God in him." Our sins were laid on Christ, punished in Christ, put away by Christ, in order that his righteousness might be imputed to us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. Although sin was charged to his account on our behalf, yet he remained perfectly sinless.
 
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      Through the devices of the great apostate, man has been led to separate himself from God, and has yielded to the temptations of the adversary of God and man in committing sin and breaking the law of the Most High. God could not alter one jot or tittle of his holy law to meet man in his fallen condition; for this would reflect discredit upon the wisdom of God in making a law by which to govern heaven and earth. But God could give his only-begotten Son to become man's substitute and surety, to suffer the penalty that was merited by the transgressor, and to impart to the repentant soul his perfect righteousness. Christ became the sinless sacrifice for a guilty race, making men prisoners of hope, so that, through repentance toward God because they had broken his holy law, and through faith in Christ as their substitute, surety, and righteousness, they might be brought back to loyalty to God and to obedience to his holy law.
 
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      "Blessed are they that mourn; for they shall be comforted." To all outward appearances the cause of mourning does not seem to be a blessing. Bereavements come in manifold form, and we ask in mournful tones, Why are we thus afflicted? Jesus answers, "Every branch that beareth fruit, he purgeth it that if may bring forth more fruit." The Lord "doth not afflict willingly nor grieve the children of men." God has manifested his love for man in giving to the human family as their substitute and surety his beloved Son. "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life," a life that runs parallel with the life of Jehovah. Christ was the brightness of his Father's glory, and in order that he might abide with him through the ceaseless ages of eternity, he came to the world to care for our apostle race. All heaven was given to us in Christ, and the Lord is bestowing rich and free mercies upon us, making every provision, in order that we shall individually stand as his representatives, making manifest to the world the efficiency and power of the grace which God alone can bestow. In view of what the Lord would make his people, it is not strange that the moral powers are disciplined by trial and sorrow. When the spiritual powers are dwarfed and crippled, when they fasten upon temporal and inferior things, the Lord permits affliction to come, just as the pruning knife is thrust into the vine branches. The tendrils entwined about earthly things must be unclasped, and earthly supports must be removed in order that the tendrils may entwine about God, and that the branch may bring forth much fruit. Christ says, "Herein is my Father glorified, that ye bear much fruit."
 
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      We are to look unto Jesus as our only hope for the taking away of our sins; for in him is no sin. He became sin for us, that he might bear our guilt, standing before the Father as guilty in our place, while we who believe in him as a personal Saviour shall, because of his merits, be accounted as pure from the contaminating influence of sin. Through the imputed righteousness of Christ, we are accounted guiltless. Christ has given to every human being the evidence that he alone is able to bear human grief, sorrow, and sin. Those who claim Christ as their substitute and surety, hanging their helpless souls upon Christ, can endure as seeing him who is invisible. The benediction, "Blessed are the pure in heart; for they shall see God," belongs to them.
 
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      The plan of redemption is perfect in all its parts. It does not lessen the claims of the law of God in one jot or one tittle, in saving the sinner from the just penalty of the law. Through the provision of the death of God's only-begotten Son in sinners' behalf, the immutability of the law of God is demonstrated for time and eternity. Justice honors the law of God in providing a substitute for the transgressor; for Christ gave his own life a ransom in order that God might be just and yet be the justifier of him who believes in Jesus. The work of saving the lost through the merit of Christ magnifies the law, and harmonizes with every perfection of Jehovah. In the plan of salvation the highest honor is paid to the law of heaven's government, and yet mercy is freely dispensed to the fallen sons of Adam. Every believing soul, cooperating with the Great Restorer, is blessed with heavenly grace and endowed with the richest treasures of the glory of God. The imagination can not picture anything more glorious than that which is attained through the plan of redemption. Well may we exclaim, "O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God!"
 
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      Through the obedience of the Son of God, through his submission to bear the death penalty for human transgression, the law is magnified and made honorable before the universe. Angels, cherubim, seraphim, and worlds unfallen behold the law vindicated and exalted. Through the unfolding of the perfection of the divine nature they see the image of God restored to man, and the honor of the divine government maintained. The wisdom of God has abounded towards all the sons and daughters of Adam. Christ laid down his life, shed his blood, suffered the death penalty for the sinner, and became the sin bearer for every repenting, believing soul. We see sin fully punished in the Substitute, and the sinner fully saved through His merit. We see the law of God highly exalted, with no jot or tittle of its authority laid aside, while the transgressor, relying upon the merit of the Substitute, is justified by the law. Through the plan of salvation we see mercy and truth met together, righteousness and peace embracing each other. There is no vacillation in the principles of God's commandments; but they are pronounced by the angels of heaven, by the inhabitants, of our fallen world, and by souls justified, as "holy, and just, and good."
 
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      Christ became our substitute and surety. He took the case of fallen man upon himself. He became the Redeemer, the Intercessor. When death was proclaimed as the penalty of sin, he offered to give his life for the life of the world, in order that man might have a second probation, and that individually he might enjoy the privileges that would come to us through this divine provision, and receive power to form a character after the divine image. But God has a day in which he will judge the world by that Man whom he hath ordained. All judgment is given into the hands of the Son. Christ has engaged to become the sinner's surety, but he does not engage to lessen or detract from the obligation to the divine law. Should Christ change the law in any particular, the demands of Satan would be fulfilled, and God and Christ and the universe would be brought under bondage to his claims. Christ is the star of hope. He is the one to contest the claims of Satan; he is the seed of the woman that shall bruise the serpent's head. He overcome Satan in heaven, and cast him out because of his rebellion and apostasy.
 
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      The Saviour is our substitute and surety. He stands at the head of the human family. He has been subject to all the temptations that annoy and oppress us. He was tempted in all points like as we are, and therefore he is able (knows just the method) to succor those that are tempted. He was afflicted in all our afflictions. Christ is our refuge, our source of strength. In him all power is provided for us if his word abide in us, and it is for us to choose whether we will serve God or Baal.
 
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      The lawyer spoke just as he was convicted, and Christ confirmed him in his interpretation of the law. "And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right; this do, and thou shalt live." How beautiful was this truth in its simplicity! This is what God requires of us. Through faith in Jesus Christ as our substitute, surety, and righteousness, we may lay hold upon divine power, so that the righteousness of the law may be fulfilled in us who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. The keeping of God's commandments is an evidence of our faith in Christ as our divine Saviour. John says, "This is the love of God, that we keep his commandments; and his commandments are not grievous." Again he writes, "Blessed are they that do his commandments, that they may have right to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gates into the city."
 
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      Jesus was the Commander of heaven, one equal with God, and yet he condescended to lay aside his kingly crown, his royal robe, and clothed his divinity with humanity. The incarnation of Christ in human flesh is a mystery. He could have come to earth as one with a remarkable appearance, unlike the sons of men. His countenance could have shone with glory, and his form could have been of remarkable grace. He could have presented such an appearance as to charm the beholder; but this was not according to the plan devised in the courts of God. He was to bear the characteristics of the human family, and the Jewish race. In all respects the Son of God was to wear the same features as did other human beings. He was not to have such beauty of person as would make him singular among men. He was to manifest no wonderful charms by which to attract attention to himself. He came as a representative of the human family before heaven and earth. He was to stand as man's substitute and surety. He was to live the life of humanity in such a way as to contradict the assertion that Satan had made that humanity was his everlasting possession, and that God himself could not take man out of his adversary's hands.
 
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      He had come to earth as man's substitute and surety, and those who would receive him by faith, believing that he was the Sent of God, were more closely related to him than were those who were united to him by the ties of human relationship. Such would not perish, but have everlasting life. They would become one with him, as he was one with the Father. His mother, as a believer and doer of his words, was more nearly and savingly related to him because of this fact than because of her natural relationship in the flesh. Those who were his brethren in a natural way, would not be the least benefited by their relationship to him, unless they accepted him as their personal Saviour. But how precious are the words of Christ to those who believe! What cause of rejoicing should they be to every soul who is linked to Christ by saving faith! What a support Christ would have found in his earthly relatives if they had believed in him as in one from heaven, and had co-operated with him in doing the work of God. But the inspired word declares, "Neither did his brethren believe on him." Christ had stated a sad fact in his experience when in Nazareth he said, "No prophet is accepted in his own country."
 
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      The result of a vital union with Christ should make all willing to give up everything if only we may be united with him. As the nourishment of the vine is carried to every true branch, so Christ's righteousness is imparted to every one who unites with him. "He was made sin for us, who knew no sin, that we might be made the righteousness of God in him." As our substitute and surety, our sins are placed to his account. His grace is given us in large measure, and this vitalizing power makes us channels of blessing to the world. "If ye abide in me," he said, "and my words abide in you, ye shall ask what ye will, and it shall be done unto you." "He that believeth on me, the works that I do shall he do also; and greater works than these shall he do; because I go unto my Father. And whatsoever ye shall ask in my name, that will I do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son."
 
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      We may say that it is impossible for us to reach God's standard; but when Christ came as our substitute and surety, it was as a human being. "He took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham." He "was made flesh, and dwelt among us." With his divinity veiled by humanity, he lived a life of perfect obedience to the law of God. "He was tempted in all points, like as we are," that he might be "able to succor them that are tempted." He has "given unto us exceeding great and precious promises; that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust." Shall we, for whom he has done and suffered so much, choose our own way in preference to that of God?
 
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      Again Christ went away, and prayed that if it were possible this cup might pass from him. His soul was filled with an overpowering fear of separation from God in consequence of sin. Satan told him that if he became the substitute and surety for a sinful world, he would nevermore be one with God, but would be under his control.
 
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      O, how much Christ had already suffered as the Son of man, in order to redeem and save men! How much he had borne as their substitute! Now the time had come when all the types and symbols pointing to his suffering and death were to be fulfilled. Shall he fail, and come short in his work of redemption? Shall the prince of darkness triumph? Shall his proud boast become truth? Shall the prey be left helpless in the hands of the mighty, or shall the captives be delivered, Satan overcome, and it be demonstrated that obedience to the law is possible; for all have been made more than conquerors through Christ?
 
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      Had he not been fully human, Christ could not have been our substitute. He could not have worked out in humanity that perfection of character which it is the privilege of all to reach. He was the light and the life of the world. He came to this earth to work in behalf of men, that they might no longer be under the control of Satanic agencies. But while bearing human nature, he was dependent upon the Omnipotent for his life. In his humanity, he laid hold of the divinity of God; and this every member of the human family has the privilege of doing. Christ did nothing that human nature may not do if it partakes of the divine nature.
 
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      Christ would teach this lesson to all who will follow him. As our Substitute and Surety, standing at the head of humanity, he is our example. He was obedient to all the requirements of God. He, the Majesty of heaven, the King of glory, laid aside his royalty, his position as Commander in the heavenly courts, came to our world as a man, and became subject to the law. And all this that man might become like his Master, obedient, no to the enemy of God, but obedient to his Father in heaven, that he might engage in the service that God requires of each of his obedient children.
 
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      Christ was now standing in a different attitude from that in which he had ever stood before. Hitherto he had been as an intercessor for others; now he longs for an intercessor for himself. In his soul anguish he lay prostrate upon the cold earth. Christ had suffered insult at the hands of the men whom he came to bless and save; he had been charged with being linked with Beelzebub, that his miracles of healing were wrought through Satanic agencies; but these things did not cause him the intense agony of soul he was now suffering. He was bearing the penalty of transgression for a sinful world. This proceeded not from Satan nor from man. It is best described in the words of the prophet, "Awake, O sword, against my Shepherd, and against the Man that is my fellow, saith the Lord of hosts." Christ was realizing his Father's frown. He was now suffering under divine justice. He saw what justice meant. He felt that as man's substitute and surety he must be bound to the altar. He had taken the cup of suffering from the lips of guilty men, and proposed to drink it himself, and in its place give to men the cup of blessing.
 
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      It was here that the mysterious cup trembled in his hand. It was here the destiny of a lost world was hanging in the balance. Would his human nature bear the strain? Would the sins of an apostate world, since Adam's transgression to the close of time, be laid upon him? Would he drink the cup? Or would he wipe the blood drops from his brow, and cast from his soul the guilt of a perishing world, which was placing him, all innocent, all undeserving, under the penalty of a just law? Would he refuse to become man's substitute and surety, refuse to give him another trial, another probation? It was not yet too late to refuse to drink that awful cup of suffering, the wrath of his Father against transgression. He might have said, "Let the wilful transgressor receive the penalty of his sin, and I will go back to my Father." But no; he did not make this choice. Altho sin was the awful thing that had opened the flood-gates of woe upon the world, he would become the propitiation of a race that had willed to sin.       Mrs. E. G. White.
 
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      Christ worked out before his disciples and before the world a perfect example of true religion. And when men show that patience, sympathy, and love for the souls of their fellow-men that Christ showed, Christ will be revealed in his followers. "We are laborers together with God," writes Paul; "ye are God's husbandry, ye are God's building." By his Holy Spirit God is framing the building, using sanctified men and women to compose his temple. But none can do a good work, at home or abroad, unless they receive power from above. If we would work as Christ worked, we must look to Christ to give our work efficiency and perfection. We must depend upon Christ, our risen and ascended Saviour, our substitute, our surety, our power, and our sufficiency.
 
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      The great plan of redemption was laid before the foundation of the world. And Christ, our Substitute and Surety, did not stand alone in the wondrous undertaking of the ransom of man. In the plan to save a lost world, the counsel was between them both; the covenant of peace was between the Father and the Son. "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." The Majesty of heaven, the King of glory, would become a servant. The only-begotten Son, in whom the Father delighted, was given for the ransom of a fallen race.
 
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      Man broke the law of God, and defied His will. This law reveals to the world the attributes of God's character, and not a jot or tittle of it could be changed to meet man in his fallen condition. God could not abolish His law to save men; for this would have immortalized transgression. But He gave men unmistakable evidence that He loved them, and that justice is the foundation of His throne and the evidence of His love. He carried out the penalty of transgression, but He allowed it to fall upon a substitute, even His only-begotten Son. "God so loved the world, that He gave His only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life." In this wonderful gift is shown the depth of God's goodness. He so loved men that, in order to save them, He gave His Son to the world, and in that gift He gave all heaven. He gave Himself in His Son, that sinners might have another trial, another opportunity to show their obedience. This was the only provision God could make. Thus a way was provided whereby sinners might return to their loyalty.
 
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      By the crucifixion of Christ the immutability of the law of God was forever established. Had it been possible, God would have changed His law to meet man in his fallen condition. But this law is unalterable, and the only way in which man could be saved was for a substitute to be provided, who would bear the penalty of transgression, and thus give man an opportunity of returning to his loyalty.
 
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      By dying on the cross, Christ gave His life as an offering for sin, that through His power man might turn from his sins, be converted, and become a laborer together with God. Greater love than this can never be shown. More could not be done than has been done to demonstrate the immutability of God's law. Christ did not die to abolish the law or to detract in the slightest degree from its influence or power. He died to exalt the law and make it honorable. Full of goodness, compassion, and love, he hated only one thing, --sin, "the transgression of the law." In the very act of dying to save what was lost, Christ reached the perfect standard of obedience as our substitute and surety. "Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, He also Himself likewise took part of the same; that through death He might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil." No pang of anguish that Christ endured was in vain. Thus the ransom was paid for all who accept Christ as their personal Saviour. From the Word of God they receive their title to freedom. "Wherefore the rather, brethren, give diligence to make your calling and election sure; . . . for so an entrance shall be ministered unto you abundantly into the everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ."
 
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      Christ has ascended on high, but before leaving this earth, He said to His chosen people: "If the world hate you, ye know that it hated Me before it hated you. If ye were of the world, the world would love his own; but because ye are not of the world, but I have chosen you out of the world, therefore the world hateth you. Remember the word that I said unto you, The servant is not greater than his Lord. If they have persecuted Me, they will also persecute you; if they have kept My saying, they will keep yours also. But all these things will they do unto you for My name's sake, because they know not Him that sent Me." Many, because of their faith, will be cut off from house and heritage here; but if they will give their hearts to Christ, receiving the message of His grace, and resting upon their Substitute and Surety, even the Son of God, they may still be filled with joy.
 
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      In His infinite mercy God took into His hands the salvation of all who would believe in Him. Because of the rebellion in the heavenly courts, the love of God was to be vindicated, not only before all heaven, but before all the worlds that He had made. Everything would be done to keep the first human beings loyal, but if they should be overcome by temptation, Christ engaged to become man's Sacrifice, his Substitute and Surety. "God so loved the world, that He gave His only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life."
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      To Thomas Jesus said, "I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life; no man cometh unto the Father, but by Me." John declares of Him, "He is the propitiation for our sins; and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world." Yet how often is Christ insulted and made ashamed by those who, while claiming godliness, place out of sight Him in whom their hopes of eternal life are centered! How is the attractive loveliness of Him who should ever be uplifted, obscured by the deceptive faith of His professed people! How is His beauty veiled, His honor withheld! God is revealed in Christ, and those who would be benefited by His salvation must center their faith in the Substitute and Surety, the Substance--the glory and power of all who believe in Him.
 
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      The atonement of Christ has been made to save all the sons and daughters of Adam from the penalty of the violated law, on condition that they repent of their transgressions, and are converted through the exercise of faith in Christ. The Lord God of heaven is to be glorified by the obedience of His subjects. This wonderful plan of salvation devised in heaven was not to vindicate transgression. In satisfying the claims of justice, Christ does not release the sinner from his obligation to keep that law. By His death Christ makes it possible for us to keep that law. The sinner is held under obligation to the law. Altho Christ died in the sinner's stead, the sinner is liable to all the penalty of the law if he does not comply with the conditions of the Gospel; and these prescribe obedience, if he would be benefited by the obedience offered. The atonement was made to take away the sin of the world. The suffering of Christ upon the cross is a living testimony borne to all human intelligences that sin is the transgression of the law. And in bearing the penalty of transgression, Christ speaks to every soul, saying, "He that spared not His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all," that through His merits He should become an accepted substitute for the sinner, "how shall we escape if we neglect so great salvation?"
 
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      The Lord of heaven is not regardless of us and our concerns, but is in communication with the fallen inhabitants of this world. Christ has not laid aside His human nature; He stands in the presence of God as our substitute and surety, our living intercessor. To Him is given all power in behalf of humanity, and all things have been committed into His hands, that He may complete the work of redemption, which was begun in such humiliation and at such an immense sacrifice.
 
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      While the death of Christ appeared to be a hellish triumph over His humanity, it was a victory so full and broad and deep that it encompassed the world. Christ was cut off, but not for Himself. He died the just for the unjust, that He might bring many sons and daughters to God. Tho innocent and undeserving of punishment, our Substitute and Surety was brought under the curse and condemnation that should have been ours. He, the perfection of holiness, was arrayed in our defiled garments, that we might be clothed with His glorious righteousness.
 
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      And "when the fulness of time was come, God sent forth His Son." God's wrath against sin must be exhausted. The punishment for sin must be borne. Having taken a survey of all that would be required of Him, Christ summed up the guilt to be canceled. He then gathered the entire responsibility to His heart, and bent His whole being to the task. He clothed His divinity with humanity, and as our Substitute and Surety, prepared Himself for the sword that was to smite Him. "For their sakes," He declared, "I sanctify Myself," in fulfilment of the covenant made before the foundations of the world were laid. "He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities; the chastisement of our peace was upon Him; and with His stripes we are healed." Christ died that He might bring life and immortality to light. Thou, O Lamb of God, didst come to offer Thyself as a living sacrifice, withdrawing Thyself from the heavenly universe, and setting Thyself apart to make a complete offering! "Therefore doth My Father love Me," He said, "because I lay down My life, that I might take it again."
 
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      Our only safety is in dying to self, and depending wholly on Christ. We need to keep ever before us the reality of Christ's humanity. When He became our Substitute and Surety, it was as a human being. He came as a man, to render obedience to the only true God. He came not to reveal God as wanting in power, but God in all His fulness. He came to show what God is willing to do and what He has done that we might be made partakers of the divine nature. While enduring the contradiction of sinners against Himself, our Saviour lived a perfect human life. This He did that we also might be perfect. He is everything to us, and He bids us look to Him, for "without Me," He says, "ye can do nothing."
 
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      Our Substitute and Surety came from heaven, declaring that He had brought with Him the vast and inestimable donation of eternal life. Pardon is offered to all who will return to their allegiance to the law of God. But Satan has called this world his territory. Here his seat is, and he holds in allegiance to himself all who refuse to keep God's commandments, who reject a plain. "Thus saith the Lord." There are but two parties in this world. All rank either under the banner of the obedient or the banner of the disobedient. Those who have given their allegiance to Satan make rigorous human enactments, in opposition to God's commands, and by precept and example strive to lead their fellow-beings into sin. They exalt the laws of men above the divine law. Over them the condemnation of God is suspended. The clouds of His justice are gathering. The material of destruction has been piling up for ages; and apostasy, rebellion, and disloyalty are continually increasing. The remnant people of God will understand the word spoken by Daniel, "Many shall be purified, and made white, and tried; but the wicked shall do wickedly; and none of the wicked shall understand; but the wise shall understand.'
 
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      The incarnate I Am is our abiding Sacrifice. The I Am is our Redeemer, our Substitute, our Surety. He is the Daysman between God and the human soul, our Advocate in the courts of heaven, our unwearying Intercessor, pleading in our behalf His merits and His atoning sacrifice. The I Am is our Saviour. In Him our hopes of eternal life are centered. He is an ever-present help in time of trouble. In Him is the assurance of every promise. We must acknowledge and receive this almighty Saviour; we must behold Him, that we may be like Him in character. "As many as received Him, to them gave He power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on His name."
 
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      Thus the great Intercessor presents His petition to the Father. No middle-man comes between the sinner and Christ. No dead prophet, no buried saint is seen. Christ Himself is our Advocate. All that the Father is to His Son He is to those whom His Son in humanity represented. In every line of His work Christ acted as a representative of the Father. He lived as our substitute and surety. He labored as He would have His followers labor, unselfishly, appreciating the value of every human being for whom He suffered and died.
 
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      Christ secured probation for man at an infinite cost. He must suffer for the sins of the world, that the purposes of God might not be defeated. He must destroy the apostate; for the death of Satan meant life to all who believe, and death to all who are disobedient. Nothing less than the life of Christ would atone for man's transgression. He must restore man by placing on vantage ground every one who would believe in Him as a personal Saviour. When there was no heart to pity, His arm brought salvation. God laid help on One that was mighty, saying, "Save man from destruction." The Son of God accepted the work joyfully, becoming man's substitute and surety, that He might save him from his sin, and call him from transgression to obedience. He pledged Himself to take man's nature, and stand at the head of the human race, to satisfy every claim made against them as a people bound in the slavery of sin. Through this gift of God to the world man has been given every opportunity of knowing God and the laws of His government.
 
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      Jesus came to this world to be our substitute and surety. He is our atoning Sacrifice; for He has offered Himself in our behalf. With unutterable love He seeks to draw all men to Him. God has given Him the priceless gifts of heaven to dispense to men. To-day He stands before God as the Advocate of the human race, pleading for the beings He has redeemed.
 
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      Christ's death on the cross  was one of willing obedience, else in it there would have been no merit; for justice would not punish in the place of the sinner an innocent being who was unwilling to bear the penalty. It was the Saviour's full and free acceptance of the penalty that made His sacrifice wholly acceptable in every point. So the sinner must freely surrender his own will to God, and accept Christ as his substitute and surety. He must rely upon Him as the only one who can change a sinner to a saint. God calls upon us to acknowledge our guilt and accept pardon from Christ, revealing our sincerity by copying His way and doing His will. Of the one who does this the words are spoken, Ye are complete in Him, not having your own righteousness, but the righteousness which is of Christ by faith.
 
ST.1901-07-31.010
      Christ is our hope. Those who trust in Him are cleansed. The grace of Christ and the government of God walk together in perfect harmony. When Jesus became man's substitute, mercy and truth met together, and righteousness and peace kissed each other. The cross of Calvary bears witness to the high claims of God's law. Christ did not die to encourage man in rebellion against God, but to provide a way whereby he might keep the whole law. His garment of spotless righteousness clothes the repenting, believing sinner. He is made unto us wisdom and righteousness and sanctification and redemption.
 
ST.1903-06-17.001
      We can not understand the mystery of redemption. It is enough for us to know that God so loved the world that He gave His only-begotten Son to die for us. The penalty of our transgression fell upon a pure, holy, innocent Substitute, even the Son of God. He bore our sins in His own body on the tree, that we might at last stand before God clothed in the robe of sinlessness.
 
ST.1904-12-14.006
      Thus was revealed the love of God, and thus was revealed also the immutability of God's law. Not a jot or a tittle of this law could be changed to meet man in his fallen condition. But sinners were not left without hope, to die in transgression. A ransom was found. Christ became their substitute and surety. Upon Him were laid "the iniquities of us all." Those who receive Him as their Saviour are freely granted pardon, and become members of the royal family.
 
ST.1905-01-25.002
      "Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets;" Christ declared; "I am not come to destroy, but to fulfil. For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in nowise pass from the law , till all be fulfilled." I have not come to destroy the law, but to show its immutability, and the holiness of its claims. God could not change His law to meet man in his fallen condition. By suffering the penalty of transgression, I will redeem the race. I have become man's substitute and surety. I have taken human nature, and have come to this earth to pass over the ground where Adam stumbled and fell. In human nature I will bear the test and proving of God. Satan has declared that man can not keep the law. I will show that his statement is false; that man can keep the law. I have come to remove deception from the minds of men, to make plain that which Satan is trying to make obscure. I have come to establish the law Satan is seeking to make void, to show how far-reaching are the principles of this law. I have come to strip from it the burdensome exactions with which man has loaded it down. I have come to show its length and breadth, its dignity and nobility. I will open before men its purity and spirituality. Not to introduce a new law, have I come, but to establish the law which to all eternity will be the standard of obedience.
 
ST.1905-06-14.008
      Men have sold themselves to the enemy of all righteousness. They can not redeem themselves. Of themselves they can do no good thing. But there is a way of escape. When man sinned, Christ offered to stand as his substitute and surety, in order to provide a way whereby the guilty race might return to loyalty. He took humanity, and passed over the ground where Adam stumbled and fell. Without swerving from His allegiance, He met the temptations wherewith man is beset.
 
ST.1906-02-28.002
                                In His Name.
      Let us, then, pray without ceasing, not in the name of any human being, but in the name of Him who is our substitute and surety. He has given us His name to use. "Ask in My name," He says. Then let us pray in faith. Let us not falter, but go forward from strength to strength, from victory to victory.
 
ST.1906-04-18.001
      The central theme of the Bible, the theme about which every other in the whole book clusters, is the redemption plan, the restoration in the human soul of the image of God. From the first intimation of hope in the sentence pronounced in Eden, to that last glorious promise of the Revelation, "They shall see His face; and His name shall be in their foreheads," the burden of every book and every passage of the Bible is the unfolding of this wondrous theme,--man's uplifting, the power of God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. Here we behold the Majesty of heaven, as He humbled Himself to become our Substitute and Surety, to cope single-handed with the powers of darkness, and to gain the victory in our behalf. A reverent contemplation of such themes as these can not fail to soften, purify, and ennoble the heart, and, at the same time, to inspire the mind with new strength and vigor.
 
ST.1907-01-16.001
      In order to save fallen man, under a sense of the infinite magnitude of the task, Christ undertook to represent to the world the character of God in His great love for the world. Nothing was allowed to divert His attention for a moment. His one effort was to carry out the plan of God laid before the foundation of the world. Said Christ, "Therefore doth My Father love Me, because I lay down My life that I might take it again." "As the Father knoweth Me, even so know I the Father; and I lay down My life for the sheep." That is: "My Father hath so loved you, that He even loves Me more for giving My life to redeem you. In becoming your substitute and surety, by surrendering My life, by taking your liabilities, your transgressions, I am endeared to My Father; for by My sacrifice, His will is fulfilled, His law vindicated, and God can be just, and yet justify him who believes in Jesus."
 
ST.1911-09-12.002
      Christ came to reveal to the sinner the justice and love of God, that He might give repentance to Israel, and remission of sins. When the sinner beholds Jesus lifted up upon the cross, suffering the guilt of the transgressor, bearing the penalty of sin; when he beholds God's abhorrence of evil in the fearful manifestation of the death of the cross, and His love for fallen man, he is led to repentance toward God because of his transgression of the law which is holy, and just, and good. He exercises faith in Christ, because the divine Saviour has become his Substitute, his Surety, and Advocate, the One in whom his very life is centered. To the repenting sinner God can show His mercy and truth, and bestow upon him His forgiveness and love.
 
ST.1913-07-29.001
      As the sinner looks upon the Saviour dying on Calvary, and realizes that the sufferer is divine, he asks why this great sacrifice was made, and the cross points to the holy law of God which has been transgressed. The death of Christ is an unanswerable argument as to the immutability and righteousness of the law. In prophesying of Christ, Isaiah says, "He will magnify the law, and make it honorable." The law has no power to pardon the evil-doer. Its office is to point out his defects, that he may realize his need of One who is mighty to save, his need of One who will become his substitute, his surety, his righteousness. Jesus meets the need of the sinner, for He has taken upon Him the sins of the transgressor. "He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon Him; and with His tripes we are healed." The sin could have cut off the sinner, and forever destroyed him; but the costlier plan was chosen. In His great love He provides hope for the hopeless, giving His only-begotten Son to bear the sins of the world. And since He has poured out all heaven in that one rich gift, He will withhold from man no needed aid that he may take the cup of salvation, and become an heir of God, joint-heir with Christ.
 
ST.1913-07-29.003
      Christ came to reveal to the sinner the justice and love of God, that He might give repentance to Israel and remission of sins. When the sinner beholds Jesus lifted up upon the cross, suffering the guilt of the transgressor, bearing the penalty of sin; when he beholds God's abhorrence of evil in the fearful manifestation of the death of the cross, and His love for fallen man, he is led to repentance toward God because of his transgression of the law which is holy, and just, and good. He exercises faith in Christ, because the divine Saviour has become his substitute, his surety, and advocate, the One in whom his very life is centered. To the repenting sinner God can show His mercy and truth, and bestow upon him His forgiveness and love.
 
ST.1914-12-15.010
      None but Christ could redeem man from the curse of the law. He proposed to take upon Himself the guilt and shame of sin,--sin so offensive in the sight of God that it would necessitate separation from His Father. Christ proposed to reach to the depths of man's degradation and woe, and restore the repenting, believing soul to harmony with God. Christ, the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world, offered Himself as a sacrifice and substitute for the fallen sons of Adam, though in this offering all heaven was involved in infinite sacrifice.
 
ST.1914-12-22.011
                   Exchange a Throne for Suffering and Death      In becoming man's substitute, in bearing the curse which should fall upon man, Christ has pledged Himself in behalf of the race to maintain the sacred and exalted honor of His Father's law. He came to convince men of sin, which is the transgression of the law, and through divine mediation bring them back to obedience to God's commandments. God has given the world into the hands of Christ, that He may completely vindicate the binding claims of the law, and make manifest the holiness of every principle.
 
ST.1915-01-05.002
      Satan and his angels exulted as they discovered that the Son of God had taken upon Himself the nature of man, and had come to be man's substitute, to engage in the conflict in our behalf. The human family had been overpowered by the deception of the enemy; for all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God, and the enemy hoped that Christ also would become a victim to his seductive wiles.
 
ST.1915-01-05.013
      Through the death of Christ a door of hope was opened for fallen man. Man was under sentence of death for the transgression of the law of God. He was under condemnation as a traitor, as a rebel; but Christ came to be his substitute, to die as a malefactor, to suffer the penalty of the traitors, bearing the weight of their sins upon His divine soul. He descended lower and lower, till there were no lower depths of humiliation to sound, in order that He might lift up those who would believe in Him, and cleanse the guilty from moral defilement, and impart to them His own righteousness. He died to make an atonement, to redeem, cleanse, restore, and exalt man to a place at His right hand.
 
YI.1874-01-01.010  Youth's Instructor
      Christ came as the sinner's substitute to bear the guilt himself, which justly belonged to man. Through the perfection of his character he was accepted of the Father as a mediator for sinful man. He only could save man by imputing to him his righteousness. His sinless, divine nature united him to God, while his human nature brought him into sympathy with the weaknesses and sufferings of humanity. "For we have not an High Priest which can not be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin." The Captain of our salvation was made perfect through suffering, and thus qualified to help fallen man just where he needed help.
 
YI.1874-02-01.002
      In the submission of Christ to the ordinance of baptism, he shows the sinner one of the important steps in true conversion. Christ had no sins to wash away, but in consenting to become a substitute for man, the sins of guilty man were imputed to him. "For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him." While God accepts Christ as the sinner's substitute, he gives the sinner a chance, with Christ's divine power to help him, to stand the test which Adam failed to endure.
 
YI.1874-02-01.004
      The steps in conversion, plainly marked out, are repentance, faith in Christ as the world's Redeemer, faith in his death, burial, and resurrection, shown by baptism, and his ascension on high to plead in the sinner's behalf. At the very commencement of his public ministry, he presents himself in the character he sustains to man throughout his mediatorial work. He identifies himself with sinners as their substitute, taking upon himself their sins, numbering himself with transgressors, and doing the work the sinner is required to do in repentance, faith, and willing obedience. What an example is here given in the life of Christ for sinners to imitate! If they will not follow the example given them, they will be without excuse.
 
YI.1874-03-01.005
      The people stood spell-bound with fear and amazement. Their eyes were fastened upon Christ, whose bowed form was bathed in the beautiful light and glory that ever surround the throne of God. His upturned face was glorified as they had never before seen the face of man. The thunders rolled and the lightnings flashed from the opening heavens, and a voice came therefrom in terrible majesty, saying, "This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased." The words of confirmation were given for the benefit of the witnesses at his baptism, and to assure God's dear Son that his Father accepted humanity through him, their substitute and surety, and that God would connect man to himself, and open Heaven to the prayers of men through the intercession of his Son.
 
YI.1892-06-23.006
      But what a scene was this on Jordan's banks! As man's substitute, Jesus presented his petition to Heaven, and was accepted. What hope does it give to man that the Father said to Christ, who represented humanity, "This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased!" In the Father's acceptance of Christ in man's behalf, guilty man is assured that through the merits of Christ, he may find access to God. He may be accepted in the Beloved. Jesus, the world's Redeemer, has opened the way, so that the most sinful, the most needy, the most oppressed and despised, may find access to the Father,--may have a home in the mansions which Jesus has gone to prepare for those who love him.
 
YI.1892-06-30.001
      Immediately after his baptism, Jesus went into the wilderness, where for forty days he was tempted by Satan. He endured the fiercest temptation, in order to break the power of the tempter over the human race. As man's surety and substitute, he engaged in a conflict with the prince of darkness, and though enduring most terrible temptation, Christ did not fail or become discouraged. He was fighting the battle in our behalf, and had he faltered, had he yielded to temptation, the human family would have been lost.
 
YI.1892-09-01.004
      Christ is the beginning and the end, the author and the finisher of our faith. He is our sacrifice, our substitute, our surety and advocate. We have a risen Saviour, and our completeness is in him; for he who entered upon the work of our salvation, humbling himself even to the death of the cross that we might be exalted, will complete that which he hath begun. "According as he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before him in love: having predestinated us unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ unto himself, according to the good pleasure of his will, to the praise of the glory of his grace, wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved."
 
YI.1893-06-08.002
      The law of God is inexorable, and abates not a claim upon any human soul. It holds to its demands upon every sinner, and makes manifest his need of penitence for sin, of faith in a crucified and risen Saviour. It daily urges upon him the necessity of cooperation with Jesus Christ, that he may be found guiltless through the merits of his substitute and surety. In the judgment you will think it has indeed been at your soul's peril that you have turned from light and evidence, that you have educated the mind to cast contempt upon the Lamb of God which taketh away the sins of the world. A faithful record is made of the thoughts, words, and deeds of every soul, and they are weighed in the golden balances of the heavenly sanctuary. God is not to be trifled with. In the parable of the talents, he who hid his Lord's money, and returned it to him without usury, is termed "wicked and slothful."
 
YI.1894-11-08.002
      No proud boasting of superior attainments will be heard from the lips of those who are being sanctified through the truth. Those who truly love God will utter no blasphemous utterances against the holy law of God; for those who do this place themselves on the side of the first great rebel. In view of the holy standard of righteousness, those who feel their sinfulness, their condition of helplessness, will urge their way to the great Physician, and blessed indeed is the man who can say with Paul: "Not as though I had already attained, either were already perfect: but I follow after." Blessed is the soul who can say, "I am guilty before God: but Jesus is my Advocate. I have transgressed his law. I cannot save myself; but I make the precious blood that  was shed on Calvary all my plea. I am lost in Adam, but restored in Christ. God, who so loved the world as to give his only begotten Son to die, will not leave me to perish while repentant and in contrition of soul. He will not look upon me, for I am all unworthy; but he will look upon the face of his  Anointed, he will look upon my Substitute and Surety, and listen to the plea of my Advocate, who died for my sin, that I might be made the righteousness of God in him. By beholding him I shall be changed into his image. I cannot change my own character, save by partaking of the grace of him who is all goodness, righteousness, mercy, and truth. But by beholding him, I shall catch his spirit, and be transformed into his likeness. 'We all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord.'"
 
YI.1894-11-29.002
      How is God reconciled to man?--By the work and merit of Jesus Christ, who has removed every objection, and put aside everything that would interpose between man and God's pardoning love. The law that man has transgressed is not changed to meet the sinner in his fallen condition, but is made manifest as the transcript of Jehovah's character,--the exponent of his holy will,--and is exalted and magnified in the life and character of Jesus Christ. Yet a way of salvation is provided; for the spotless Lamb of God is revealed as the One who taketh away the sin of the world. Jesus stands in the sinner's place, and takes the guilt of the transgressor upon himself. Looking upon the sinner's substitute and surety, the Lord Jehovah can be just, and yet be the justifier of him that believeth in Jesus. To him who accepts Christ as his righteousness, as his only hope, pardon is pronounced; for God was in Christ reconciling the world unto himself. The justice, truth, and holiness of Christ, which are approved by the law of God, form a channel through which mercy may be  communicated to the repenting, believing sinner.
 
YI.1894-12-06.001
      Christ is the sinner's substitute and surety. He has obeyed the law in the sinner's place, in order that the sinner may believe in him, and grow up into him in all things to the full stature of a man in Christ Jesus, and thus be complete in him. Christ has made reconciliation for sin, and has borne all its ignominy, reproach, and punishment; and yet while bearing sin, he has brought in everlasting righteousness, so that the believer is spotless before God. The time comes when it is asked, "Who shall lay anything to the charge of God's elect?" and the answer is, "It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again." He who has the spotless robe of righteousness, woven in the loom of heaven, in which is not a thread that sinful humanity can claim, is at the right hand of God, to clothe his believing children in the perfect garment of his righteousness. Those who are saved in the kingdom of God will have nothing of which to boast in themselves; the praise and the glory will all flow back to God the giver of salvation.
 
YI.1895-09-05.001
      Christ does not use this parable to commend the man who hides the treasure until he can buy the field; but his object in using this illustration is to convey to our mind the value of spiritual things. To obtain worldly treasure, the man would make a sacrifice of his all; and how much more should we give for the priceless, heavenly treasure! He said again: "The kingdom of heaven is like unto a merchant-man, seeking goodly pearls: who, when he had found one pearl of great price, went and sold all that he had, and bought it." This goodly pearl represents the priceless treasure of Christ, as does the gold hid in the field. In Christ we have everything that is needful for us in this life, and that which will make up the joy of the world to come. All the money in the world will not buy the gift of peace and rest and love. These gifts are provided for us through faith in Christ. We cannot purchase these gifts from God; we have nothing with which to buy them. We are the property of God; for mind, soul, and body have been purchased by the ransom of the life of the Son of God. Then how can we buy the Son of God as our treasure? Jesus says: "I counsel thee to buy of me gold tried in the fire, that thou mayest be rich; and white raiment, that thou mayest be clothed, and that the shame of thy nakedness do not appear; and anoint thine eyes with eye-salve, that thou mayest see." Then what is it to buy the eternal treasure?--It is simply to give back to Jesus his own, to receive him into the heart by faith. It is cooperation with God; it is bearing the yoke with Christ; it is lifting his burdens. For our sakes he became poor, that we through his poverty might be made rich. The Lord Jesus laid aside his royal crown, he left his high command, he clothed his divinity with humanity, in order that through humanity he might uplift the human race. He so appreciated the possibility of the human race that he became man's substitute and surety. He places upon man his own merit, and thus elevates him in the scale of moral value with God. Christ is the atoning sacrifice. He left the glory of heaven, he parted with his riches, he laid aside his honor, not in order to create love and interest for man in the heart of God, but to be an exponent of the love that existed in the heart of the Father. He came into the world to make man accept the fact that although man had sinned against God, "God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." Jesus paid the price of all his riches, he assumed humanity, he condescended to a life of poverty and humiliation, in order that he might seek and save that which was lost.
 
YI.1895-10-10.003
      Satan is exercising his power over the human race. He accused God and Christ, misrepresenting the Father, and deceiving men in regard to the Prince of the hosts of heaven. More and more he was obscuring the knowledge of the only true God, taking possession of the minds of men, and afflicting their bodies. The messengers that God sent were refused, beaten, and killed. Christ came to the world to meet the wily foe, and to dispute his claim of sovereignty over the earth. He came to the world as a man, veiling his majesty and glory, clothing his divinity with humanity, in order that he might not extinguish the sinful race, but stand where man stood, to endure the temptations under which Adam failed. He became the substitute and surety for the fallen world, and submitted to every test that could be brought to bear upon his loyalty to God. He had only the advantages in the battle which are the privilege of fallen man. He was tempted in all points like as we are, but he met Satan with the weapon of God's word, saying, "It is written."
 
YI.1897-01-21.006
      The subject of obedience involves eternal interests. Through his misrepresentation of God, Satan had made the law appear as an arbitrary exaction, enforced by God to keep his creatures from a higher education in the knowledge of good and evil. It was this knowledge of evil that the Lord did not wish our first parents to obtain. He wanted them to be wise through understanding only that which it was for their happiness to know. But by the disobedience of Adam, the flood-gates of woe were opened upon our world. It was then that Christ offered himself as man's substitute and surety, and consented to come to earth, and meet the tempter, who, through falsifying the character and purposes of God, had caused the ruin of our first parents.
 
YI.1897-05-27.007
      Having become man's substitute and surety, Christ felt a longing of soul, a hunger, for the accomplishment of the salvation of the human race. To rescue them he came to this world, that by humbling himself, he might reach man in his fallen condition. And when man accepts the great salvation, and becomes a co-worker with God, Christ rejoices. Love returned makes glad the heart of Christ. Those who obey his words become sons and daughters of God. Blessings flow through Christ to them, and their influence draws others to him.
 
YI.1897-08-05.002
      In the gift of his Son as a substitute and surety for fallen man, is an everlasting testimony to the world, to the heavenly universe, and to worlds unfallen, of the sacred regard which God has for the honor of his law and the eternal stability of his own moral government. It was also an expression of his love and mercy for the fallen human race. In the plan of redemption, this Saviour was to bring glory to God by making manifest his love for the world.
 
YI.1899-07-13.007
      Christ stands at the head of humanity as its substitute and surety, to represent God to man, and, through his power, to cause a stream of spiritual life to flow earthward. The Sun of Righteousness, he desires to shine into the chambers of the mind, purifying and elevating the soul, that he may abide therein, and control the affections and emotions, bringing the entire being into conformity to his will.
 
YI.1899-07-20.012
      Christ is the representative of God to man, and the representative of man to God. He came to this world as man's substitute and surety, and he is fully able to save all who repent and return to their allegiance. Because of his righteousness, he is able to place man on vantage-ground. Christ our Passover has been sacrificed for us. He gave his precious, sinless life to save guilty human beings from eternal ruin, that through faith in him they might stand guiltless before the throne of God. What return have we made for his great sacrifice?
 
YI.1899-12-28.003
      When we are tempted to question whether Christ resisted temptation as a man, we must search the Scriptures for the truth. As the substitute and surety of the human race, Christ was placed in the same position toward the Father as is the sinner. Christ had the privilege of depending on the Father for strength, and so have we. Because he laid hold of the hand of infinite power, and held it fast, he overcame; and we are taught to do the same. He met every temptation with, "It is written;" and so must we. The one who resists evil in his strength can say, in the words of Inspiration: "The Lord God will help me: therefore shall I not be confounded: therefore have I set my face like a flint, and I know that I shall not be ashamed. He is near that justifieth me; who will contend with me? . . . Behold, the Lord God will help me: who is he that shall condemn me?"
 
KC.063.003 Kress Collection
  Having Christ in the heart, we have an eye single to the glory of God. We should strive to comprehend what it means to be in complete union with Christ, who is the propitiation for our sins, and for the sins of the whole world, our substitute and surety for the sins before the Lord God of heaven. Our life should be bound up in the life of Christ; we should draw constantly from Him, partaking of Him, the living bread that came down from heaven, drawing from a fountain ever fresh, ever giving forth its abundant treasures. When this is in truth the experience of the Christian, there is seen in his life freshness, a simplicity, humility, meekness, and lowliness of heart, that show all with whom he associates that he has been with Jesus, and learned of Him.
 
 
PC.360.001 Paulson Collection of Ellen G. White Letters
  It is the sufferings of our Redeemer in his life and death that makes it possible for fallen man to become refined and elevating. As the divine substitute and surety, he elevates the fallen race in character, and brings their minds into healthful sympathy with the divine mind. Those who are partakers of the divine nature see that true-heartedness means continual humiliation, self-denial, and self sacrifice. Those who have spiritual eyesight will discern that God does not honor those who are honored by the world, but those who are true to principle.  December 26, 1896  L.E.H.
 
SPM.146.001 Spalding and Magan's Unpublished Manuscript Testimonies of Ellen G. White
  When all hope was excluded from Adam and Eve, in consequence of transgression and sin, when justice demanded the death of the sinner, Christ gave himself to be a sacrifice for the sin of the world. The world was under condemnation. Christ became substitute and surety for man. He would give his life for the world, which is represented as the one lost sheep that had strayed from the fold, whose guilt as well as helplessness was charged against it in the way, hindering its return. Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son to be a propitiation for our sins. All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the Lord hath laid on him the iniquity of us all. Every son and daughter of God, if they have an abiding Saviour, will act our Christ. Every soul that has not an abiding Saviour will reveal in unChristlikeness of character. Love is not cherished and put into exercise. "Lift him up, the risen Saviour," in our words, in our conversation, in our dealing with the erring.
 
SPM.343.002
  Men have sold themselves to the enemy of all righteousness. They can not redeem themselves. Of themselves they can do no good thing. But there is always an escape. When man sinned, Christ offered to stand as his substitute and surety, in order to provide a way whereby the guilty race might return to loyalty. He took humanity, and passed over the ground where Adam stumbled and fell. Without swerving from his allegiance, he met the temptations wherewith man is beset.
 
2SP.059.001 Spirit of Prophecy Vol 2 1877
      Christ came not confessing his own sins; but guilt was imputed to him as the sinner's substitute. He came not to repent on his own account; but in behalf of the sinner. As man had transgressed the law of God, Christ was to fulfill every requirement of that law, and thus show perfect obedience. "Lo, I come to do thy will, O God!" Christ honored the ordinance of baptism by submitting to this rite. In this act he identified himself with his people as their representative and head. As their substitute, he takes upon him their sins, numbering himself with the transgressors, taking the steps the sinner is required to take, and doing the work the sinner must do. His life of suffering and patient endurance after his baptism were an example to converted sinners of what they should endure and patiently suffer in consequence of their transgressions and sins. John finally yielded to the request of Christ, notwithstanding his feelings of unworthiness to baptize him, and performed the service. He led the Saviour of the world down into the river Jordan in the presence of a large concourse of people, and buried him in the water.
 
 
2SP.085.003
      Let us pause in the history of Christ's earthly life, and briefly notice the events prior to his advent in a world of sin. Satan, after compassing the fall of Adam and Eve, had boasted that he was monarch of the earth, and it was true that in all ages of the world he had found many followers. But he had failed to unite fallen man with him as he had hoped to do, and thus reign supreme over the whole earth. Though man in his fallen state was suffering the consequence of his disobedience, yet he was not without hope. He was unable, because of his guilt, to come directly before God with his supplications, but the plan of redemption, devised in Heaven, transferred the sentence of death from the obedient and faithful, to a substitute. There must be the shedding of blood, for death was the consequence of man's sin. In the slain victim, man was to see for the time being the fulfillment of God's word: "Ye shall surely die." The flowing blood also signified an atonement, and pointed forward to a Redeemer who would one day come to the world and die for the sins of man, thus fully vindicating is Father's law.
 
2SP.092.004
      In becoming man's substitute, and conquering where man had been vanquished, Christ was not to manifest his divine power to relieve his own suffering, for fallen man could work no miracles in order to save himself from pain, and Christ, as his representative, was to bear his trials as a man, leaving an example of perfect faith and trust in his Heavenly Father.
 
3SP.161.002  Spirit of Prophecy, Vol 3 1878
      The mission of Christ's earthly life was now nearly accomplished. His tongue was parched, and he said, "I thirst." They saturated a sponge with vinegar and gall and offered it him to drink; and when he had tasted it, he refused it. And now the Lord of life and glory was dying, a ransom for the race. It was the sense of sin, bringing the Father's wrath upon him as man's substitute, that made the cup he drank so bitter, and broke the heart of the Son of God. Death is not to be regarded as an angel of mercy. Nature recoils from the thought of dissolution, which is the consequence of sin.
 
 
3SP.162.002
      As man's substitute and surety, the iniquity of men was laid upon Christ; he was counted a transgressor that he might redeem them from the curse of the law. The guilt of every descendant of Adam of every age was pressing upon his heart; and the wrath of God, and the terrible manifestation of his displeasure because of iniquity, filled the soul of his Son with consternation. The withdrawal of the divine countenance from the Saviour, in this hour of supreme anguish, pierced his heart with a sorrow that can never be fully understood by man. Every pang endured by the Son of God upon the cross, the blood drops that flowed from his head, his hands, and feet, the convulsions of agony which racked his frame, and the unutterable anguish that filled his soul at the hiding of his Father's face from him, speak to man, saying, It is for love of thee that the Son of God consents to have these heinous crimes laid upon him; for thee he spoils the domain of death, and opens the gates of Paradise and immortal life. He who stilled the angry waves by his word, and walked the foam-capped billows, who made devils tremble, and disease flee from his touch, who raised the dead to life and opened the eyes of the blind,--offers himself upon the cross as the last sacrifice for man. He, the sin-bearer, endures judicial punishment for iniquity, and becomes sin itself for man.
 
4SP.265.001 Spirit of Prophecy Vol 4 1884
      Important truths concerning the atonement may be learned from the typical service. A substitute was accepted in the sinner's stead; but the sin was not canceled by the blood of the victim. A means was thus provided by which it was transferred to the sanctuary. By the offering of blood, the sinner acknowledged the authority of the law, confessed his guilt in transgression, and expressed his desire for pardon through faith in a Redeemer to come; but he was not yet entirely released from the condemnation of the law. On the day of atonement the high priest, having taken an offering from the congregation, went into the most holy place with the blood of this general offering, and sprinkled it upon the mercy-seat, directly over the law, to make satisfaction for its claims. Then, in his character of mediator, he took the sins upon himself, and bore them from the sanctuary. Placing his hands upon the head of the scape-goat, he confessed over him all these sins, thus in figure transferring them from himself to the goat. The goat then bore them away, and they were regarded as forever separated from the people.
 
 
GC88.420.001 Great Controversy Between Christ and Satan 1888
      Important truths concerning the atonement are taught by the typical service. A substitute was accepted in the sinner's stead; but the sin was not canceled by the blood of the victim. A means was thus provided by which it was transferred to the sanctuary. By the offering of blood, the sinner acknowledged the authority of the law, confessed his guilt in transgression, and expressed his desire for pardon through faith in a Redeemer to come; but he was not yet entirely released from the condemnation of the law. On the day of atonement the high priest, having taken an offering from the congregation, went into the most holy place with the blood of this offering, and sprinkled it upon the mercy-seat, directly over the law, to make satisfaction for its claims. Then, in his character of mediator, he took the sins upon himself, and bore them from the sanctuary. Placing his hands upon the head of the scape-goat, he confessed over him all these sins, thus in figure transferring them from himself to the goat. The goat then bore them away, and they were regarded as forever separated from the people.
 
 
GW92.028.003 Gospel Workers 1892
      We must have a converted ministry. The efficiency and power attending a truly converted minister would make the hypocrites in Zion tremble, and sinners afraid. The standard of truth and holiness is trailing in the dust. If those who sound the solemn notes of warning for this time could realize their accountability to God, they would see the necessity for fervent prayer. When the cities were hushed in midnight slumber, when every man had gone to his own house, Christ, our example, would repair to the Mount of Olives, and there, amid the overshadowing trees, would spend the entire night in prayer. He who was himself without the taint of sin,--a treasure-house of blessing; whose voice was heard in the fourth watch of the night by the terrified disciples upon the stormy sea, in heavenly benediction; and whose word could summon the dead from their graves,--he it was who made supplication with strong crying and tears. He prayed not for himself, but for those whom he came to save. As he became a suppliant, seeking at the hand of his Father fresh supplies of strength, and coming forth refreshed and invigorated as man's substitute, he identified himself with suffering humanity, and gave them an example of the necessity of prayer.
 
2RED.013.002 The Temptation of Christ 1887-88 Pamplet
                 Plan of Redemption.      A council was held in Heaven, the result of which was that God's dear Son undertook to redeem man from the curse and the disgrace of Adam's failure, and to conquer Satan. Oh, wonderful condescension! The Majesty of Heaven, through love and pity for fallen man, proposed to become his substitute and surety. He would bear man's guilt. He would take the wrath of his Father upon himself, which otherwise would have fallen upon man because of his disobedience.
 
2RED.019.001
              Sacrificial Offerings.      Fallen man, because of his guilt, could no longer come directly before God with his supplications; for his transgression of the divine law had placed an impassable barrier between the holy God and the transgressor. But a plan was devised that the sentence of death should rest upon a substitute. In the plan of redemption there must be the shedding of blood, for death must come in consequence of man's sin. The beasts for sacrificial offerings were to prefigure Christ. In the slain victim, man was to see the fulfillment for the time being of God's word, "Ye shall surely die." And the flowing of the blood from the victim would also signify an atonement. There was no virtue in the blood of animals; but the shedding of the blood of beasts was to point forward to a Redeemer who would one day come to the world and die for the sins of men. And thus Christ would fully vindicate his Father's law.
 
2RED.040.002
      Christ did not appear to notice the reviling taunts of Satan. He was not provoked to give him proofs of his power, but meekly bore his insults without retaliation. The words spoken from Heaven at his baptism were precious evidence to him that his Father approved the steps he was taking in the plan of salvation, as man's substitute and surety. The opening heavens, and descent of the heavenly dove, were assurances that his Father would unite his power in Heaven with that of his Son upon the earth, to rescue man from the control of Satan, and that God accepted the effort of Christ to link earth to Heaven, and finite man to the infinite God.
 
2RED.043.001
      The Saviour of the world became sin for the race. In becoming man's substitute, Christ did not manifest his power as the Son of God; but ranked himself among the sons of men. He was to bear the trial of temptation as a man, in man's behalf, under the most trying circumstances, and leave an example of faith and perfect trust in his Heavenly Father. Christ knew that his Father would supply him food when it would be for his glory. He would not in this severe ordeal, when hunger pressed him beyond measure, prematurely diminish one particle of the trial allotted to him, by exercising his divine power.
 
2RED.045.001
      The exalted Son of God in assuming humanity draws himself near to man by standing as the sinner's substitute. He identifies himself with the sufferings and afflictions of men. He was tempted in all points as man is tempted that he might know how to succor those who should be tempted. Christ overcame on the sinner's behalf.
 
5RED.081.002
      The mission of Christ's earthly life was now nearly accomplished. His tongue was parched, and he said, "I thirst." They saturated a sponge with vinegar and gall and offered it him to drink; and when he had tasted it, he refused it. And now the Lord of life and glory was dying, a ransom for the race. It was the sense of sin, bringing the Father's wrath upon him as man's substitute, that made the cup he drank so bitter, and broke the heart of the Son of God. Death is not to be regarded as an angel of mercy. Nature recoils from the thought of dissolution, which is the consequence of sin.
 
5RED.082.002
      As man's substitute and surety, the iniquity of men was laid upon Christ; he was counted a transgressor that he might redeem them from the curse of the law. The guilt of every descendant of Adam of every age was pressing upon his heart; and the wrath of God, and the terrible manifestation of his displeasure because of iniquity, filled the soul of his Son with consternation. The withdrawal of the divine countenance from the Saviour, in this hour of supreme anguish, pierced his heart with a sorrow that can never be fully understood by man. Every pang endured by the Son of God upon the cross, the blood drops that flowed from his head, his hands, and feet, the convulsions of agony which racked his frame, and the unutterable anguish that filled his soul at the hiding of his Father's face from him, speak to man, saying, It is for love of thee that the Son of God consents to have these heinous crimes laid upon him; for thee he spoils the domain of death, and opens the gates of Paradise and immortal life. He who stilled the angry waves by his word, and walked the foam-capped billows, who made devils tremble, and disease flee from his touch, who raised the dead to life and opened the eyes of the blind,--offers himself upon the cross as the last sacrifice for man. He, the sin-bearer, endures judicial punishment for iniquity, and becomes sin itself for man.
 
PH079.019.001 Special  Instruction Regarding Royalties 1899
      I would say to my fellow laborers. The Lord would have us obtain new experiences, a growth in grace and in the knowledge of God, by using for the Master the gifts we have. We are dependent upon Christ for spiritual food and vitality. It is only by feeding upon Christ that we can have sanctification and power, that we can know Christ and be a faithful co-worker with God. Let no man become your substitute. Christ is your substitute. Go to Him who has taken you under his charge. "Ye are not your own; for ye are bought with a price." All you have in mental, physical, and spiritual capacities comes from God, and you are to render to him perfect service in every line, holding fast the Lord Jesus Christ. This is our availing power for the purity of the soul. This will cleanse and purify us, day by day and hour by hour.
 
PH117.007.001 Testimony for the Chruch at Battle Creek 1882
      In the word of God, the mind finds subject for the deepest thought, the loftiest aspiration. Here we may hold communion with patriarchs and prophets, and listen to the voice of the Eternal as he speaks with men. Here we behold the Majesty of Heaven, as he humbled himself to become our substitute and surety, to cope single-handed with the powers of darkness, and to gain the victory in our behalf. A reverent contemplation of such themes as these, cannot fail to soften, purify, and ennoble the heart, and, at the same time, to inspire the mind with new strength and vigor.